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Visions of Peace in Our Time

JFK RFK MLK Peace desegregation Linclon

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#1 Greg Burnham

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 05:08 PM

I made this video for our members and for those who visit this site. It is a reminder of what was lost and why. Our emotional response to

these events is as important as was the passion with which these leaders originally infused us.

 

Too often we allow our intellects to rule our hearts rather than co-exist with it. If we don't feel the loss we have no barometer on why it's

still just as important today as it was in 1865, 1963, and 1968.

 

A Tribute to My Old Friends

Abraham, Martin, John & Bobby

 

 

 

 

 

 

The potential for peace need not die with the death of the dreamer. Peace dies when those who survive cease to dream. --

Greg Burnham

 

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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#2 Terry Martin

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 05:38 PM

Lovely video.

 

Thanks, Greg.

 

Terry



#3 Bob Wilkerson

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 06:16 PM

Greg

 

To answer the question you so poignantly asked in your tribute to four of our iconic leaders of the past, no.  It will not end this way.  Not as long as we Americans honor our Constitution, and value truth above the occult pronouncements of our own government.  The murders of President Kennedy, Martin King, Robert Kennedy and Malcolm X eviscerated the progressive movement in this country, and, in my opinion, set our national path to several wars, social upheaval and the political chaos of the 1970s.  While we as a people can never right the wrong of those murders, we can educate ourselves as much as possible about them in order to insure that such actions are no longer possible to hide from the spotlight of truthful, thorough analysis.  Your effort with this website and forum are part of that spotlight of unbiased analysis.  Thank you for this effort to keep the hope of Lincoln for the future of our nation, alive.

 

Bob


Bob

Hony soit qui mal e pense.


#4 Christina Gill

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 06:44 PM

Greg

That was so beautiful. Thank you for taking the time to put that together. To answer the question at the end. No I don't want to let it end this way but I'm afraid I'm at a loss at what to do. I mean I have a pretty good idea but getting it accomplished would be a difficult task. In the meantime just spread the word in any way we can.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie -- deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -President John F.Kennedy

 

"A nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people." -President John F. Kennedy

 

"Forgive your enemies but never forget their names." -President John F. Kennedy

 

JFK

 

 

 

 


#5 Greg Burnham

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:41 AM

I appreciate your replies.

 

It never ceases to amaze me that those who fight so hard for peace often end up the victim of graphic violence. Public execution.

Postmortem character assassination. Distortions of personal history.

 

Is peace really that threatening to the power structure? Often the military/industrial complex takes the wrap, but to leave it at that

would be shallow. Who profits most from war and least from peace? Banks and Wall Street. Even then, we've added to the singularity

of that which is.

 

Who finances Wall Street? The banks.

 

I am a most unhappy man. I have unwittingly ruined my country. A great industrial nation is controlled by its system of credit. Our system

of credit is concentrated. The growth of the nation, therefore, and all our activities are in the hands of a few men. We have come to be one

of the worst ruled, one of the most completely controlled and dominated governments in the civilized world. No longer a government by free

opinion, no longer a government by conviction and the vote of the majority, but a government by the opinion and duress of a small group of

dominant men.  ~ Woodrow Wilson

 


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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#6 Alan Dale

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:18 AM

4 June, 1968.

 

In consecutive shifts my mother and then my father divided the day by driving groups of elderly voters from nursing homes to the polls where Robert F. Kennedy's fight to win the California democratic primary was being waged. During my mother's shift, squeezing as many as 5 elderly but determined Kennedy supporters at a time into our Dodge station wagon, my father took me into the Ambassador Hotel's Embassy Ballroom where I hoped I would see Senator Kennedy, but instead experienced only the incredibly blinding glare of television lights. I had met Senator Kennedy before in New Albany, Indiana. I was excited at the prospect of meeting him again. He was alive when I fell asleep in a room upstairs before the results of the election were known.

He was still alive, but mortally wounded, when I awoke early the next morning and found, to my surprise, my father, awake and in front of the television, sitting with his hands clasped in his lap, leaning forward, watching the screen. I had never known my dad, a full time professional musician, to be awake before late, late morning or noon. He hadn't slept. Only I. Nobody else had slept. I may have asked what was going on. What I remember my father saying was this: "Somebody should take the guy who did this and machine gun him against a wall."

That's how I learned what had happened. Senator Kennedy lived 25 and a half hours after being shot. He died at 1:44am, 6 June, 1968. He was 42 years old.

Be glad you weren't there.


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#7 Greg Burnham

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:54 PM


In June 2012, I revisited the El Cortez Hotel in downtown San Diego near dusk. On June 4th, 1968 (46 years ago) I went to
see Senator Robert F. Kennedy speak there with my mother and one of my sisters. I was 11 years old at the time. As his open
convertible was pulling out of the hotel's parking garage several of his personal body guards (the Secret Service were not
as yet assigned to protect presidential candidates until AFTER he was assassinated) noticed that he was standing to wave at
the crowd. They grabbed him and forced him back into his seat. When he landed, I lunged across the barrier ropes and grabbed
him by the lapel and tie. He looked right at me and smiled broadly. Then someone lightly tapped my hand several times until I
let go. But, I will never forget his smile--his warmth. He seemed to draw energy from human contact. I definitely drew energy
from it.

The next night I watched his life force leak inexorably from his head wound with my family. As we watched through the night,
keeping a vigil, I know that I wasn't alone in feeling that perhaps he would pull through if we just kept hope. Time was frozen,
and then, he was gone.

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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#8 Alan Dale

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 10:25 PM

^ Indelible. Thanks for sharing, Greg.



#9 Adele Edisen

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 10:44 PM

Greg, your wonderful video brought tears to my eyes and sad, sad memories from the past. 

What we lost in that decade was our future of peace  and much more.   For me, the one image

that appears  in my mind is symbolic of the hideous hatred directed toward President John Kennedy

by a man sitting at a table in the dining room of the Marriot Motor Hotel across the    Potomac River

on the opposite side from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Tuesday evening, April 23, 1963.

What was so horrible and bizarre was that he was actually gloating as he spoke of "it" happeninmg,

marked by an "X" near a square on a piece of note paper, representing a large room in a building in

Dallas where "some men were."    It was much later when I understood what "it" was meant to be.


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#10 Christina Gill

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:03 AM

Allan thank you for sharing that story with us. I can't imagine how it felt to be there that night.

Greg I'm jealous you got to meet him but happy for you nonetheless.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie -- deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -President John F.Kennedy

 

"A nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people." -President John F. Kennedy

 

"Forgive your enemies but never forget their names." -President John F. Kennedy

 

JFK

 

 

 

 


#11 Greg Burnham

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:43 AM

Greg, your wonderful video brought tears to my eyes and sad, sad memories from the past. 

What we lost in that decade was our future of peace  and much more.   For me, the one image

that appears  in my mind is symbolic of the hideous hatred directed toward President John Kennedy

by a man sitting at a table in the dining room of the Marriot Motor Hotel across the    Potomac River

on the opposite side from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Tuesday evening, April 23, 1963.

What was so horrible and bizarre was that he was actually gloating as he spoke of "it" happeninmg,

marked by an "X" near a square on a piece of note paper, representing a large room in a building in

Dallas where "some men were."    It was much later when I understood what "it" was meant to be.

 

Adele,

 

I'm not happy that the images evoke such emotions even though they should. I'm not

happy that I felt it was necessary to make the video. I'm not happy that such a "reality"

video is even possible. But when we as human beings dissociate from the emotions

that are normal to our species due to their severity, we also dissociate from the memory

of the events from which the emotions originate. It is a psychological defense mechanism

of sorts, akin to denial. We must learn to resist the voluntary, albeit unconscious, adoption

of forgetfulness that we employ in our attempt to find false comfort from the otherwise

emotional storm such memories would produce.

 

One of the things that each of these men shared in common was their ability to feel at

very deep levels. They were not only sensitive, but passionate about the pursuit of their

respective visions. They infused us with that vision by evoking a strong empathic response

from us. Through their example of compassion for all mankind--no matter the color of a

person's skin, the person's lot in life, their country of origin, or their religious affiliation--we

learned that love was not only possible, but desirable. Their opposition to war was the means

by which that compassion could transcend the boundaries between nations.

 

I am reminded of the impassioned speech given by Robert Kennedy in Indianapolis upon

learning of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in which he said that King had dedicated

his life to love and peace. He pleaded that the murder not translate into what could have

amounted to a race war citing the fact that the accused murderer of his own brother was

a white man. He was not making a statement in condemnation of Oswald, nor was it his intent

to endorse the fiction of the Warren Commission Report. Rather, he was wisely redirecting

all who heard his speech away from violence, urging them to not seek revenge by starting a

race war that they could not possibly win and pointing out that his murder was not necessarily

racially based. The message was deliberate and direct, yet it was the subtlety that persuaded. 

 

Thanks for your tears Adele. They make you human.

 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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#12 Jim Hackett II

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:10 PM

Monk, Greg, Friend:

Ah man, ya did it again... touched me with Our History and included rare music.

 

I understand the version of "Abraham, Martin and John/Dion" that included the reference to Bobby was and is rare.

Your work on the opening video is beyond Outstanding.

 

When touched by this what do I find deeper in the thread?

 

Bobby's speech in Indianapolis about Martin King's murder!!

 

Before that I was touched, after... silent tears of regret for what was lost in that one summer.

 

I was in the crowd that night in the rain. Snuck out of the house of my parents to hitch-hike to hear the man speak.

Age 15.

Never imagining the after effects of the travel, nor the tragedy he gave us all news about.

Never had the honor to be closer than a hundred feet of Bobby but one could feel the humanity of that individual.

 

One immediate effect was that Indy had no race riot because of that one man and his speech of love, I feel.

Little did I know the loss coming so soon on the heels of that rainy night in Indy.

Love and passion for life cannot be invisible.

That night changed me forever. And I knew it at the time.

 

It was worth it to face the music of my parents for running off. I knew that too.

 

Thanks again Greg.

Jim


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#13 Greg Burnham

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:10 PM

You're welcome, my friend.

 

I didn't know you were at RFK's speech that night. Amazing. Thanks for recounting your experience of it for us.

These leaders transcended the otherwise insurmountable barriers that were perceived to exist between people

of disparate interests, backgrounds, ethnicities, religious persuasions, financial circumstances, and cultural

distinctions both domestic and international. They taught us that peace and love are existential, independent of

our acknowledgment. They simply are ours if we choose to embrace them.

 

In April of 1968 that is precisely what the people chose to embrace and we are a better people for it. By that single

demonstration of what was possible--a door was opened "To Seek a Newer World" for our own benefit and for the 

benefit of those who come after us.


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Research Forum

 
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