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The Public Papers of JFK (in order)


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#41 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:23 PM

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41.

 

Joint Statement Following Discussions With the Foreign Minister of Germany. 

February 17, 1961

 

THE PRESIDENT of the United States received the Foreign Minister of the Federal Republic of Germany, Dr. Heinrich von Brentano, on February 17, 1961, for a discussion of questions of mutual interest to both countries. Together with his previous conversations with Secretary of State Dean Rusk, the discussion provided an occasion for a first personal exchange of views between Dr. von Brentano and the New United States Administration. The cordial and frank conversations confirmed the friendly and close relations between the Federal Republic and the United States. 
     There was particular agreement that the North Atlantic Alliance is a necessary basis for the defense of both countries and that all members of the Alliance have a mutual responsibility for its further strengthening. They confirmed the continuing importance of the goal of German reunification based upon the principle of self-determination and of the preservation of the freedom of the people of West Berlin. 
     Both governments agreed that the persistent imbalance in the international payments situation called for concerted and vigorous action on the part of the free world. Unless and until this imbalance is substantially corrected it will continue to impede the free world's efforts to provide for the common defense and supply the resources needed by the less-developed countries to meet their legitimate aspirations. 
     Both the United States and the Federal German Republic have recognized this principle in previous discussions. Proceeding from this basis both governments will continue their talks on appropriate measures which can be taken to contribute to this end. In so doing they will act in concert with their common allies. 
     The President heard with satisfaction that the Federal Government will be prepared to provide the necessary means to carry on its program for the underdeveloped countries in future years. 
  
  
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#42 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:24 PM

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42.

 

Statement by the President Upon Signing Order Abolishing the 

 Operations Coordinating Board. February 19, 1961


 

I AM TODAY issuing an Executive Order abolishing the Operations Coordinating Board. This Board was used in the last Administration for work which we now plan to do in other ways. This action is part of our program for strengthening the responsibility of the individual departments. 
     First, we will center responsibility for much of the Board's work in the Secretary of State. He expects to rely particularly on the Assistant Secretaries in charge of regional bureaus, and they in turn will consult closely with other departments and agencies. This will be our ordinary rule for continuing coordination of our work in relation to a country or area. 
     Second, insofar as the OCB - as a descendant of the old Psychological Strategy Board - was concerned with the impact of our actions on foreign opinion - our "image" abroad - we expect its work to be done in a number of ways: in my own office, in the State Department, under Mr. Murrow of USIA, and by all who are concerned with the spirit and meaning of our actions in foreign policy. We believe that appropriate coordination can be assured here without extensive formal machinery. 
     Third, insofar as the OCB served as an instrument for ensuring action at the President's direction, we plan to continue its work by maintaining direct communication with the responsible agencies, so that everyone will know what I have decided, while I in turn keep fully informed of the actions taken to carry out decisions. We of course expect that the policy of the White House will be the policy of the Executive Branch as a whole, and we shall take such steps as are needed to ensure this result. 
     I expect that the senior officials who served as formal members of OCB will still keep in close and informal touch with each other on problems of common interest. Mr. Bromley Smith, who has been the Executive Officer of the OCB, will continue to work with my Special Assistant, Mr. McGeorge Bundy, in following up on White House decisions in the area of national security. In these varied ways we intend that the net result shall be a strengthening of the process by which our policies are effectively coordinated and carried out, throughout the Executive Branch.


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#43 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:25 PM

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43.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House 

Transmitting Bill To Amend the Social Security Act. 
February 20, 1961

My dear Mr. ----------: 
     I am transmitting herewith a bill to make five needed improvements in the social security program. 
     They will not only help to meet pressing social needs, but if promptly enacted these improvements will give our economic recovery program needed impetus. They will result in placing increased purchasing power in the hands of almost five million pepple. These people are among the lowest inqome groups in the country. 
     In addition, the legislation will improve the flexibility and effectiveness of our social security program over the long run and make it better able to contribute to the economic strength of the Nation and the welfare and security of our people. 
     The enclosed letter from the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare describes the legislation in more detail. 
         Sincerely,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
     Secretary Ribicoff's letter, also released, recommended the following improvements in the social security program: 
         1. Increases in the minimum benefits. 
         2. Retirement benefits for men at age 62. 
         3. Liberalization of the insured status requirements. 
         4. Increases in benefits for widows, widowers, or parents. 
         5. Providing benefits after 6-months total disability even though it is expected the worker will eventually recover. 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#44 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:25 PM

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44.

 

Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives 

Transmitting a Distressed Area Redevelopment Bill. 
February 20, 1961

 

Dear Mr. Speaker: 
     On January 25, in letters addressed to you and to the Vice President, I recommended the enactment of legislation to redevelop areas of substantial and persistent unemployment. Enclosed for the consideration of the Congress is a draft of a bill which would carry out this purpose. 
     This matter has been the subject of long study by both the Federal Government and private interests. The need is urgent. The benefits to the national economy are clear. When enacted, the legislation will help develop long-term job opportunities in those parts of our Nation which are suffering most from unemployment. It will encourage new industry to locate and existing industry to expand in industrial areas and in underdeveloped rural and small urban areas which require a better balance of industry and agriculture. 
     The basic provisions of the bill are those which: 
     1. Provide technical assistance to local communities to enable them to plan intelligently their economic development and to explore methods of expansion of their industrial resources; 
     2. Provide for participating loans to meet the gap created when conventional lending facilities are unavailable to the local industry; 
     3. Provide for modernized public facilities, such as access roads, industrial water, industrial parks and public utilities, so that industry will be encouraged to locate in these areas; 
     4. Provide, in cooperation with State, local and private organizations, for the expansion of facilities and opportunities for training and re-training the labor force in new and improved skills. 
     I believe it is essential that we enact this legislation at the earliest possible date. It will constitute a major effort to revive and redevelop communities which have too long been handicapped. 
         Sincerely,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#45 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:26 PM

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45.

 

Joint Statement Following Discussions With Prime Minister Diefenbaker of Canada. 

February 20, 1961

 

PRESIDENT KENNEDY and Prime Minister Diefenbaker met today in Washington to discuss informally a wide range of international problems as well as bilateral questions of interest to the two countries. The Secretary of State, Mr. Dean Rusk, and the United States Ambassador-designate to Canada, Mr. Livingston Merchant, assisted in these discussions together with the Secretary of State for External Affairs, Mr. Howard Green, and the Canadian Ambassador to the United States, Mr. Arnold Heeney. 
     The President and the Prime Minister welcomed this early opportunity for a friendly exchange of views between neighbors, in a tradition consistent with the long and intimate association between the peoples of Canada and the United States. 
     The President and the Prime Minister reviewed defense and security problems in all their aspects. They reaffirmed their purpose to work together for peace and freedom in the world. They expressed their readiness to cooperate wholeheartedly with all countries which sincerely seek this objective whatever the differences in approach or outlook. They recognized the central importance of the United Nations, as well as the essential role of direct diplomatic negotiation, in the pursuit of peaceful settlements. They agreed on the need to work steadily toward effective agreements under international control in the field of disarmament. 
     In reviewing the bilateral problems between the two countries, emphasis was placed upon the various consultative arrangements of a formal and informal character which have been developed between the United States and Canada as a valuable supplement to the traditionally close and friendly relations between the two governments. The President and the Prime Minister noted with satisfaction that joint meetings are about to take place in Canada between members of both houses of the federal legislatures of the two nations. 
     The President and the Prime Minister re-emphasized the importance of close consultation on economic matters. They announced that the joint United States-Canada Committee on Trade and Economic Affairs will meet in Washington, D.C. on March 13. This joint Committee at Cabinet level has been of great value over the years in furthering understanding between the two governments on questions affecting economic relations of the two countries.


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Research Forum

 
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#46 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:27 PM

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46.

 

Special Message to the Congress on Education. 

February 20, 1961

To the Congress of the United States: 
     Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. Our requirements for world leadership, our hopes for economic growth, and the demands of citizenship itself in an era such as this all require the maximum development of every young American's capacity. 
     The human mind is our fundamental resource. A balanced Federal program must go well beyond incentives for investment in plant and equipment. It must include equally determined measures to invest in human beings - both in their basic education and training and in their more advanced preparation for professional work. Without such measures, the Federal Government will not be carrying out its responsibilities for expanding the base of our economic and military strength. 
     Our progress in education over the last generation has been substantial. We are educating a greater proportion of our youth to a higher degree of competency than any other country on earth. One-fourth of our total population is enrolled in our schools and colleges. This year 26 billion dollars will be spent on education alone. 
     But the needs of the next generation - the needs of the next decade and the next school year - will not be met at this level of effort. More effort will be required - on the part of students, teachers, schools, colleges and all 50 states - and on the part of the Federal Government. 
     Education must remain a matter of state and local control, and higher education a matter of individual choice. But education is increasingly expensive. Too many state and local governments lack the resources to assure an adequate education for every child. Too many classrooms are overcrowded. Too many teachers are underpaid. Too many talented individuals cannot afford the benefits of higher education. Too many academic institutions cannot afford the cost of, or find room for, the growing numbers of students seeking admission in the 60's. 
     Our twin goals must be: a new standard of excellence in education - and the availability of such excellence to all who are willing and able to pursue it.

I. ASSISTANCE TO PUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

     A successful educational system requires the proper balance, in terms of both quality and quantity, of three elements: students, teachers and facilities. The quality of the students depends in large measure on both the quality and the relative quantity of teachers and facilities. 
     Throughout the 1960's there will be no lack in the quantity of students. An average net gain of nearly one million pupils a year during the next ten years will overburden a school system already strained by well over a half-million pupils in curtailed or half-day sessions, a school system financed largely by a property tax incapable of bearing such an increased load in most communities. 
     But providing the quality and quantity of teachers and facilities to meet this demand will be major problems. Even today, there are some 90,000 teachers who fall short of full certification standards. Tens of thousands of others must attempt to cope with classes of unwieldy size because there are insufficient teachers available. 
     We cannot obtain more and better teachers - and our children should have the best - unless steps are taken to increase teachers' salaries. At present salary levels, the classroom cannot compete in financial rewards with other professional work that requires similar academic background. 
     It is equally clear that we do not have enough classrooms. In order to meet current needs and accommodate increasing enrollments, if every child is to have the opportunity of a full-day education in an adequate classroom, a total of 600,000 classrooms must be constructed during the next ten years. 
     These problems are common to all states. They are particularly severe in those states which lack the financial resources to provide a better education, regardless of their own efforts. Additional difficulties, too often overlooked, are encountered in areas of special educational need, where economic or social circumstances impose special burdens and opportunities on the public school. These areas of special educational need include our depressed areas of chronic unemployment and the slum neighborhoods of our larger cities, where underprivileged children are overcrowded into substandard housing. A recent survey of a very large elementary school in one of our major cities, for example, found 91% of the children coming to class with poor diets, 87% in need of dental care, 21% in need of visual correction and 19% with speech disorders. In some depressed areas roughly one-third of the children must rely on surplus foods for their basic sustenance. Older pupils in these schools lack proper recreational and job guidance. The proportion of dropouts, delinquency and classroom disorders in such areas in alarmingly high. 
     I recommend to the Congress a three-year program of general Federal assistance for public elementary and secondary classroom construction and teachers' salaries. 
     Based essentially on the bill which passed the Senate last year (S. 8), although beginning at a more modest level of expenditures, this program would assure every state of no less than $15 for every public school student in average daily attendance, with the total amount appropriated (666 million dollars being authorized in the first year, rising to $866 million over a three-year period) distributed according to the equalization formula contained in the last year's Senate bill, and already familiar to the Congress by virtue of its similarity to the formulas contained in the Hill-Burton Hospital Construction and other acts. Ten percent of the funds allocated to each state in the first year, and an equal amount thereafter, is to be used to help meet the unique problems of each state's "areas of special educational need" - depressed areas, slum neighborhoods and others. 
     This is a modest program with ambitious goals. The sums involved are relatively small when we think in terms of more than 36 million public school children, and the billions of dollars necessary to educate them properly. Nevertheless, a limited beginning now - consistent with our obligations in other areas of responsibility - will encourage all states to expand their facilities to meet the increasing demand and enrich the quality of education offered, and gradually assist our relatively low-income states in the elevation of their educational standards to a national level. 
     The bill which will follow this message has been carefully drawn to eliminate disproportionately large or small inequities, and to make the maximum use of a limited number of dollars. In accordance with the clear prohibition of the Constitution, no elementary or secondary school funds are allocated for constructing church schools or paying church school teachers' salaries; and thus non-public school children are rightfully not counted in determining the funds each state will receive for its public schools. Each state will be expected to maintain its own effort or contribution; and every state whose effort is below the national average will be expected to increase that proportion of its income which is devoted to public elementary and secondary education. 
     This investment will pay rich dividends in the years ahead - in increased economic growth, in enlightened citizens, in national excellence. For some 40 years, the Congress has wrestled with this problem and searched for a workable solution. I believe that we now have such a solution; and that this Congress in this year will make a land-mark contribution to American education.

II. CONSTRUCTION OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY FACILITIES

     Our colleges and universities represent our ultimate educational resource. In these institutions are produced the leaders and other trained persons whom we need to carry forward our highly developed civilization. If the colleges and universities fail to do their job, there is no substitute to fulfill their responsibility. The threat of opposing military and ideological forces in the world lends urgency to their task. But that task would exist in any case. 
     The burden of increased enrollments - imposed upon our elementary and secondary schools already in the fifties - will fall heavily upon our colleges and universities during the sixties. By the autumn of 1966, an estimated one million more students will be in attendance at institutions of higher learning than enrolled last fall - for a total more than twice as high as the total college enrollment of 1950. Our colleges, already hard-pressed to meet rising enrollments since 1950 during a period of rising costs, will be in critical straits merely to provide the necessary facilities, much less the cost of quality education. 
     The country as a whole is already spending nearly $1 billion a year on academic and residential facilities for higher education - some 20 percent of the total spent for higher education. Even with increased contributions from state, local and private sources, a gap of $2.9 billion between aggregate needs and expenditures is anticipated by 1965, and a gap of $5.2 billion by 1970. 
     The national interest requires an educational system on the college level sufficiently financed and equipped to provide every student with adequate physical facilities to meet his instructional, research, and residential needs. 
     I therefore recommend legislation which will: 
     (1) Extend the current College Housing Loan Program with a five year $250 million a year program designed to meet the Federal Government's appropriate share of residential housing for students and faculty. As a start, additional lending authority is necessary to speed action during fiscal 1961 on approvable loan applications already at hand. 
     (2) Establish a new, though similar, long-term, low-interest rate loan program for academic facilities, authorizing $300 million in loans each year for five years to assist in the construction of classrooms, laboratories, libraries, and related structures - sufficient to enable public and private higher institutions to accommodate the expanding enrollments they anticipate over the next five years; and also to assist in the renovation, rehabilitation, and modernization of such facilities.

III. ASSISTANCE TO COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

     This nation a century or so ago established as a basic objective the provision of a good elementary and secondary school education to every child, regardless of means. In 1961, patterns of occupation, citizenship and world affairs have so changed that we must set a higher goal. We must assure ourselves that every talented young person who has the ability to pursue a program of higher education will be able to do so if he chooses, regardless of his financial means. 
     Today private and public scholarship and loan programs established by numerous states, private sources, and the Student Loan Program under the National Defense Education Act are making substantial contributions to the financial needs of many who attend our colleges. But they still fall short of doing the job that must be done. An estimated one-third of our brightest high school graduates are unable to go on to college principally for financial reasons. 
     While I shall subsequently ask the Congress to amend and expand the Student Loan and other provisions of the National Defense Education Act, it is clear that even with this program many talented but needy students are unable to assume further indebtedness in order to continue their education. 
     I therefore recommend the establishment of a five-year program with an initial authorization of $26,250,000 of state-administered scholarships for talented and needy young people which will supplement but not supplant those programs of financial assistance to students which are now in operation. 
     Funds would be allocated to the states during the first year for a total of twenty-five thousand scholarships averaging $700 each, 37,500 scholarships the second year, and 50,000 for each succeeding year thereafter. These scholarships, which would range according to need up to a maximum stipend of $1000, would be open to all young persons, without regard to sex, race, creed, or color, solely on the basis of their ability - as determined on a competitive basis - and their financial need. They would be permitted to attend the college of their choice, and free to select their own program of study. Inasmuch as tuition and fees do not normally cover the institution's actual expenses in educating the student, additional allowances to the college or university attended should accompany each scholarship to enable these institutions to accept the additional students without charging an undue increase in fees or suffering an undue financial loss.

IV. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

     The National Vocational Education Acts, first enacted by the Congress in 1917 and subsequently amended, have provided a program of training for industry, agriculture, and other occupational areas. The basic purpose of our vocational education effort is sound and sufficiently broad to provide a basis for meeting future needs. However, the technological changes which have occurred in all occupations call for a review and re-evaluation of these Acts, with a view toward their modernization. 
     To that end, I am requesting the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to convene an advisory body drawn from the educational profession, labor-industry, and agriculture as well as the lay public, together with representation from the Departments of Agriculture and Labor, to be charged with the responsibility of reviewing and evaluating the current National Vocational Education Acts, and making recommendations for improving and redirecting the program.

CONCLUSION

     These stimulatory measures represent an essential though modest contribution which the Federal Government must make to American education at every level. One-sided aid is not enough. We must give attention to both teachers' salaries and classrooms, both college academic facilities and dormitories, both scholarships and loans, both vocational and general education. 
     We do not undertake to meet our growing educational problems merely to compare our achievements with those of our adversaries. These measures are justified on their own merits - in times of peace as well as peril, to educate better citizens as well as better scientists and soldiers. The Federal Government's responsibility in this area has been established since the earliest days of the Republic - it is time now to act decisively to fulfill that responsibility for the sixties.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

  
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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#47 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:28 PM

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47.

 

Remarks at the Presentation of the Medal of Freedom to Paul Henri Spaak, 

Secretary General of NATO. 
February 21, 1961

MAY I SAY, speaking for myself, that one opportunity to present this medal to Mr. Spaak is an extremely pleasant one. 
     This is the first such occasion that has been provided to me as President of the United States. The idea of the Atlantic Community, of the close association between members of NATO, has been one that has occupied many men's attention in the years since the end of the war. But I don't think that any man has given more than Mr. Spaak. 
     Liberty is not easy to find. It is a search that takes us on a hard road. But Mr. Spaak has been willing to follow that road, and I think that all of us who are members of NATO have benefited from this close attention he has given to the search. 
     We wish him well in whatever he may do in the future, but I think that he will agree that the service that he has provided to all of us who are members of NATO represents a most distinguished and happy occasion in his work. 
     We value his association. And this presentation before the members of NATO, before the Ambassadors speaking for their country, I think indicates our high regard for you and our gratitude to you for your work.

NOTE: The President presented the award at a ceremony held at 11:20 a.m. in his office at the White House. 
     Mr. Spaak responded as follows: 
     "Mr. President, I ask permission to say a few words, but to say them in French, because my English is never very good. 
     "When I am touched, it is indeed bad. I am very thankful to you. I am very touched and honored by the medal just awarded to me. 
     "I am leaving NATO, and one of my regrets is not to work with your administration any longer, as I have in the past, because the medal that you have just presented to me is, for me, a sign that that cooperation during these years has been a happy relationship. 
     "NATO is a great institution, a very useful institution - it can only function at its best if the United States plays a great role in it and shows its interest. And this medal which is given to me - and personally touches me deeply - seems to me to be also a proof of the importance that the United States Government attaches to NATO - and shows its strong desire to continue to participate in the work of the Organization with the same willingness that it has shown in the past. 
     "I am therefore doubly thankful. For myself, Mr. President, and for NATO, I thank you most sincerely." 
       Mr. Spaak served as Secretary General of NATO from May 1957 to March 4, 1961. 
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#48 Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:29 PM

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48.

 

Remarks to the Delegates to the Youth Fitness Conference. 

February 21, 1961

 

Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. Secretary: 
     I want to express my great appreciation at the opportunity to be here with you, and to express my thanks to all of you for having attended this conference. 
     I asked those members of the Cabinet who felt they were physically fit to come here today, and I am delighted that Mr. Udall and Mr. Robert Kennedy and Governor Ribicoff responded to the challenge. 
     Some years ago, another President of the United States who was also interested in physical fitness, Mr. Theodore Roosevelt, expressed some ambition that - I think members of the armed services would improve their physical fitness. As there was some question about his, you will recall that he then rode a horse for a hundred miles. 
     We don't have to prove it in 1961. We take it for granted that the members of the administration are all physically fit and our presence here today is an effort to encourage all of you in your work. 
     Since the time of the ancient Greeks, we have always felt that there was a close relationship between a strong, vital mind and physical fitness. It is our hope that using the influence of the National Government that we can expand this strong spirit among American men and women, that they will concern themselves with this phase of their personal development. 
     We do not want in the United States a nation of spectators. We want a nation of participants in the vigorous life. This is not a matter which can be settled, of course, from Washington. It is really a matter which starts with each individual family. It is my hope that mothers and fathers, stretching across the United States, will be concerned about this phase of their children's development, that the communities will be concerned to make it possible for young boys and girls to participate actively in the physical life, and that men and women who have reached the age of maturity will concern themselves with maintaining their own participation in this phase of national vigor - national life. 
     I am hopeful that we can develop here today, with your help and suggestions, a program which will inspire our country to be concerned. I don't think we have to read these tests which we have seen so much of during the last 10 years to realize that because of the generosity of nature, because of the way our society is organized, that there has been less emphasis on national vigor, national vitality, physical well-being, than there has been in many other countries of the world. 
     I want to do better. And I think you want to do better. We want to make sure that as our life becomes more sophisticated, as we become more urbanized, that we don't lose this very valuable facet of our national character: physical vitality, which is tied into qualities of character, which is tied into qualities of intellectual vigor and vitality. 
     So I think that you are performing a real service in being here. We want your suggestions and ideas. This has to flow two ways, and we want the flow today to come from you to tell us how you think we can use the influence of the National Government - its prestige - in order to increase the emphasis which we can place in every community across the country, in every home, in this most important program. 
     I am particularly glad that we have here today teachers from over 67 countries who have been teaching in the United States and traveling through it, and who have now come to the National Capital before they return home. I hope they realize how much we learn from them - this is a two-way street, and all of these program which have brought hundreds of teachers in the last 15 to 20 years, which have brought them to all parts of the country; that each of you leaves behind you an understanding of the problems and opportunities of your country, your culture, your -civilization, what you believe; and by your looking at us, we see something of ourselves. 
     This is a program which we benefit from. In many ways, I think, we are the greater beneficiary, and I hope that when you go back to your countries, that you will tell them something of what we are trying to do here. You will tell them, though we may not always realize our high ambitions and our high goals, that nevertheless we are attempting to advance ourselves, and that there is tremendous interest in what is going on in the world around us. 
     During the fall, I spoke, as many Members of Congress have spoken, about a Peace Corps. I am hopeful that it will be possible to bring that into realization, but what has been most interesting has been the great response of young men and women who desire not merely to serve the United States, but who desire to serve the cause of freedom which is common I think to all countries and to all people. 
     I hope that when the Peace Corps ultimately is organized, and young men and women go out around the world, that they will place their greatest emphasis on teaching; and secondly, that they will learn themselves far more than they will teach, and that we will therefore have another link which binds us to the world around us. 
     I want to express my thanks to all of you, whether you come from across the sea or here in the United States. We are all involved in this great effort together. And therefore I wish you well. I express my thanks to all of you. I want you to know that we here in Washington are intimately concerned with the matters in which you are engaged. 
     Thank you.

 

NOTE: The President spoke in the Health, Education, and Welfare Auditorium. In his opening words he referred to Secretary Ribicoff who also serves as Chairman of the President's Council on Youth Fitness. 
  
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#49 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:30 PM

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49.

 

Special Message to the Congress on Natural Resources. 

February 23, 1961

 

To the Congress of the United States: 
     From the beginning of civilization, every nation's basic wealth and progress has stemmed in large measure from its natural resources. This nation has been, and is now, especially fortunate in the blessings we have inherited. Our entire society rests upon - and is dependent upon - our water, our land, our forests, and our minerals. How we use these resources influences our health, security, economy, and well-being. 
     But if we fail to chart a proper course of conservation and development - if we fail to use these blessings prudently - we will be in trouble within a short time. In the resource field, predictions of future use have been consistently understated. But even under conservative projections, we face a future of critical shortages and handicaps. By the year 2000, a United States population of 300 million - nearly doubled in 40 years - will need far greater supplies of farm products, timber, water, minerals, fuels, energy, and opportunities for outdoor recreation. Present projections tell us that our water use will double in the next 20 years; that we are harvesting our supply of high-grade timber more rapidly than the development of new growth; that too much of our fertile topsoil is being washed away; that our minerals are being exhausted at increasing rates; and that the Nation's remaining undeveloped areas of great natural beauty are being rapidly pre-empted for other uses. 
     Wise investment in a resource program today will return vast dividends tomorrow, and failures to act now may be opportunities lost forever. Our country has been generous with us in this regard - and we cannot now ignore her needs for future development. 
     This is not a matter of concern for only one section of the country. All those who fish and hunt, who build industrial centers, who need electricity to light their homes and lighten their burdens, who require water for home, industrial, and recreational purposes - in short, every citizen in every State of the Union - all have a stake in a sound resources program under the progressive principles of national leadership first forged by Pinchot and Theodore Roosevelt, and backed by the essential cooperation of State and local governments. 
     This statement is designed to bring together in one message the widely scattered resource policies of the Federal Government. In the past, these policies have overlapped and often conflicted. Funds were wasted on competing efforts. Widely differing standards were applied to measure the Federal contribution to similar projects. Funds and attention devoted to annual appropriations or immediate pressures diverted energies away from long-range planning for national economic growth. Fees and user charges wholly inconsistent with each other, with value received, and with public policy have been imposed at some Federal developments. 
     To coordinate all of these matters among the various agencies, I will shortly issue one or more Executive Orders or directives: 
     (1) Redefining these responsibilities within the Executive Office and authorizing a strengthened Council of Economic Advisers to report to the President, the Congress and the public on the status of resource programs in relation to national needs; 
     (2) Establishing, under the Council of Economic Advisers, a Presidential Advisory Committee on Natural Resources, representing the Federal agencies concerned in this area and seeking the advice of experts outside of government; and 
     (3) Instructing the Budget Director, in consultation with the Departments and agencies concerned, to formulate within the next 90 days general principles for the application of fees, permits and other user charges at all types of Federal natural resource projects or areas; and to reevaluate current standards for appraising the feasibility of water resource projects. 
     In addition, to provide a coordinated framework for our research programs in this area, and to chart the course for the wisest and most efficient use of the research talent and facilities we possess, I shall ask the National Academy of Sciences to undertake a thorough and broadly based study and evaluation of the present state of research underlying the conservation, development, and use of natural resources, how they are formed, replenished and may be substituted for, and giving particular attention to needs for basic research and to projects that will provide a better basis for natural resources planning and policy formulation. Pending the recommendations of the Academy, I have directed my Science Advisor and the Federal Council for Science and Technology to review ongoing Federal research activities in the field of natural resources and to determine ways to strengthen the total government research effort relating to natural resources.

I. WATER RESOURCES

     Our Nation has been blessed with a bountiful supply of water; but it is not a blessing we can regard with complacency. We now use over 300 billion gallons of water a day, much of it wastefully. By 1980 we will need 600 billion gallons a day. 
     Our supply of water is not always consistent with our needs of time and place. Floods one day in one section may be countered in other days or in other sections by the severe water shortages which are now afflicting many Eastern urban areas and particularly critical in the West. Our available water supply must be used to give maximum benefits for all purposes - hydroelectric power, irrigation and reclamation, navigation, recreation, health, home and industry. If all areas of the country are to enjoy a balanced growth, our Federal Reclamation and other water resource programs will have to give increased attention to municipal and industrial water and power supplies as well as irrigation and land redemption; and I am so instructing the Secretary of the Interior, in cooperation with the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of the Army.

1. Planning and Development.

     A. We reject a "no new starts" policy. Such a policy denied the resource requirements and potential on which our economic growth hinges and took a heavy toll in added costs and even human life and homes by postponing essential flood control projects. I have requested the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, working with appropriate department and agency heads, to schedule a progressive, orderly program of starting new projects to meet accumulated demands, taking into account the availability of funds, and implementing with the agencies concerned, wherever possible, the very excellent and timely report of the bi-partisan Senate Select Committee on National Water Resources issued three weeks ago. 
     B. This Administration accepts the goal urged by the Senate Select Committee to develop comprehensive river basin plans by 1970, in cooperation with the individual States. I urge the Congress to authorize the establishment of planning commissions for all major river basins where adequate coordinated plans are not already in existence. These commissions, on which will be represented the interested agencies at all levels of government, will be charged with the responsibility of preparing comprehensive basic development plans over the next several years. 
     C. A major reason for such planning is the ability to identify both the need and the location of future reservoir sites far in advance of construction. This advantage will be dissipated in great measure if the selected sites are not preserved - for uninhibited commercial and residential development in such areas increase ultimate acquisition costs and may result in pressures against the project required. I urge the Congress to enact legislation permitting the reservation of known future reservoir sites by the operating agency whenever such protection is necessary. 
     D. The full development of the power and other water resource potentials of the Columbia Basin is a vision that must be fulfilled. The Columbia River Joint Development Treaty with Canada is before the Senate for approval. I urge the Senate to approve this Treaty at the earliest possible time, to permit an immediate start on the immense efforts that can be jointly undertaken in power production and river control in that Basin. 
     E. This Administration is committed to strengthening and speeding up our flood control program as rapidly as our fiscal and technical capabilities permit. Unfortunately, efforts to reduce flood losses by constructing remedial works are being partially offset by rapid industrial and residential development of flood plain lands. 
     I am asking all Federal agencies concerned to provide data on flood hazards in specified areas to all 50 States, and to assist in their efforts for effective regulation or zoning of the flood plains. In addition, I have instructed the Federal agencies concerned with urban development - including the Housing and Home Finance Agency and the Bureau of Public Roads - to coordinate their activities with the flood control agencies to insure that their programs utilize flood information to advantage. 
     F. Complementing larger downstream reservoirs in the control of flood waters are the small watershed projects which are an integral part of our soil and water conservation program, along with terracing, strip cropping, grass waterways and other erosion prevention measures. Nearly 300 million of our nation's 460 million acres of farm crop lands still need these basic practices for preserving our water and soil resources. I have asked the Secretary of Agriculture, in cooperation with other interested Federal agencies, to review the basic objectives of our soil conservation and watershed management programs, and to make certain that any Federal assistance is directed toward realizing maximum benefits for the Nation as a whole. In addition, there should be improved coordination of the various Federal and local activities in this field.

2. Water and Air Pollution Control.

     Pollution of our country's rivers and streams has - as a result of our rapid population and industrial growth and change - reached alarming proportions. To meet all needs - domestic, agricultural, industrial, recreational - we shall have to use and reuse the same water, maintaining quality as well as quantity. In many areas of the country we need new sources of supply - but in all areas we must protect the supplies we have. 
     Current corrective efforts are not adequate. 
     This year a national total of $350 million will be spent from all sources on municipal waste treatment works. But $600 million of construction is required annually to keep pace with the growing rate of pollution. Industry is lagging far behind in its treatment of wastes. 
     For a more effective water pollution control program, I propose the following- 
     First, I urge enactment of legislation along the general lines of H.R. 4036 and S. 120 extending and increasing Federal financial assistance for the operation of State and interstate water pollution control agencies. 
     Secondly, I urge that this legislation increase the amount of Federal assistance to municipalities for construction of waste treatment facilities in order to stimulate water pollution construction in those cities with inadequate facilities. 
     Third, I urge that this legislation strengthen enforcement procedures to abate serious pollution situations of national significance. 
     Fourth, I propose an intensive and broadened research effort to determine the specific sources of water pollution and their adverse effects upon all water uses; the effects upon the health of people exposed to water pollution; and more effective means of preventing, controlling, or removing the contaminants - including radioactive matter - that now pollute our rivers and streams so that the water may be safely used. 
     Fifth, I propose the establishment of a special unit within the Public Health Service under the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, where control measures to prevent and limit pollution of our water will be developed. 
     Sixth, this same unit should provide new leadership, research and financial and technical assistance for the control of air pollution, a serious hazard to the health of our people that causes an estimated $7.5 billion annually in damage to vegetation, livestock, metals and other materials. We need an effective Federal air pollution control program now. For although the total supply of air is vast, the atmosphere over our growing metropolitan areas - where more than half the people live - has only limited capacity to dilute and disperse the contaminants now being increasingly discharged from homes, factories, vehicles, and many other sources.

3. Saline and Brackish Water Conversion.

     No water resources program is of greater long-range importance - for relief not only of our shortages, but for arid nations the world over - than our efforts to find an effective and economical way to convert water from the world's greatest, cheapest natural resources - our oceans - into water fit for consumption in the home and by industry. Such a break-through would end bitter struggles between neighbors, states, and nations - and bring new hope for millions who live out their lives in dire shortage of usable water and all its physical and economical blessings, though living on the edge of a great body of water throughout that parched life-time. 
     This Administration is currently engaged in redoubled efforts to select the most promising approaches to economic desalinization of ocean and brackish waters, and then focus our energies more intensively on those approaches. At my request, a panel of the President's Science Advisory Committee has been working with the Secretary of the Interior to assure the most vigorous and effective research and development program possible in this field. 
     I now pledge that, when this know-how is achieved, it will immediately be made available to every nation in the world who wishes it, along with appropriate technical and other assistance for its use. Indeed the United States welcomes now the cooperation of all other nations who wish to join in this effort at present. 
     I urge the Congress to extend the current saline water conversion research program, and to increase the funds for its continuation to a level commensurate with the effort our current studies will show to be needed - now estimated to be at least twice the level previously requested.

II. ELECTRIC POWER

     To keep pace with the growth of our economy and national defense requirements, expansion of this Nation's power facilities will require intensive effort by all segments of our power industry. Through 1980, according to present estimates of the Federal Power Commission, total installed capacity should triple if we are to meet our nation's need for essential economic growth. Sustained heavy expansion by all power suppliers - public, cooperative and private - is clearly needed. 
     The role of the Federal Government in supplying an important segment of this power is now long established and must continue. We will meet our responsibilities in this field. 
     - Hydroelectric sites remaining in this country will be utilized and hydroelectric power will be incorporated in all multiple-purpose river projects where optimum economic use of the water justifies such action. 
     - The Tennessee Valley Authority will continue to use the financing authority granted it by the last Congress to meet the power needs of the area it serves. 
     - Our efforts to achieve economically competitive nuclear power before the end of this decade in areas where fossil fuel costs are high will be encouraged through basic research, engineering developments, and construction of various prototype and full scale reactors by the Atomic Energy Commission in cooperation with industry. 
     - In marketing Federal power, this Administration will be guided by the following basic principles which recognize the prior rights of the general public, consumer and taxpayer who have financed the development of these great national assets originally vested in them: 
     (1) Preference in power sales shall be given public agencies and cooperatives. 
     (2) Domestic and rural consumers shall have priority over other consumers in the disposal of power. 
     (3) Power shall be sold at the lowest possible rates consistent with sound business principles. 
     (4) Power disposal shall be such as to encourage widespread use and to prevent monopolization. 
     Finally, I have directed the Secretary of the Interior to develop plans for the early interconnection of areas served by that Department's marketing agencies with adequate common carrier transmission lines; to plan for further national cooperative pooling of electric power, both public and private; and to enlarge such pooling as now exists.

III. FORESTS

     Our forest lands present the sharpest challenge to our foresight. Trees planted today will not reach the minimum sizes needed for lumber until the year 2000. Most projections of future timber requirements predict a doubling of current consumption within forty years. At present cutting rates, we are using up our old growth timber in Western stands. Because of the time requirements involved, we must move now to meet anticipated future needs, and improve the productivity of our nearly 500 million acres of commercial forest land. 
     Unfortunately, the condition of our forest land area is substantially below par: 45 million acres are in need of reforestation; more than 150 million acres require thinnings, release cuttings and other timber stand improvement measures if growth rates are to be increased and quality timber produced; forest protection must be extended to areas now poorly protected. Losses in growth from insects and disease need to be reduced substantially by wider application of known detection and control measures. 
     (A) I urge the Congress to accelerate forest development on Federal public lands both as a long-term investment measure and as an immediate method of relieving unemployment in distressed areas. 
     ( B ) To make additional supplies of merchantable timber available to small businesses, I have directed the Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to accelerate the program of building approved access roads to public forests. 
     © A more difficult and unresolved forest situation lies in that half of our forest land held in small private ownerships. These lands, currently far below their productive potential, must be managed to produce a larger share of our future timber needs. Current forest owner assistance programs have proven inadequate. I am therefore directing the Secretary of Agriculture, in cooperation with appropriate Federal and state agencies, to develop a program to help small independent timber owners and processors attain better forest management standards and more efficient production and utilization of forest crops.

IV. PUBLIC LANDS

     The Federal Government owns nearly 770 million acres of public land, much of it devoted to a variety of essential uses. But equally important are the vacant, unappropriated and unreserved public domain lands, amounting to some 477 million acres - a vital national reserve that should be devoted to productive use now and maintained for future generations. 
     Much of this public domain suffers from uncontrolled use and a lack of proper management. More than 100 million acres of our Federal Grazing Districts are producing livestock forage well below their potential. We can no longer afford to sit by while our public domain assets so deteriorate. 
     I am, therefore, directing the Secretary of the Interior to- 
     (1) accelerate an inventory and evaluation of the nation's public domain holdings to serve as a foundation for improved resource management; 
     (2) develop a program of balanced usage designed to reconcile the conflicting usesgrazing, forestry, recreation, wildlife, urban development and minerals; and 
     (3) accelerate the installation of soil conserving and water saving works and practices to reduce erosion and improve forage capacity; and to proceed with the revegetation of range lands on which the forage capacity has been badly depleted or destroyed.

V. OCEAN RESOURCES

     The sea around us represents one of our most important but least understood and almost wholly undeveloped areas for extending our resource base. Continental shelves bordering the United States contain roughly 20 percent of our remaining reserves of crude oil and natural gas. The ocean floor contains large and valuable deposits of cobalt, copper, nickel, and manganese. Ocean waters themselves contain a wide variety of dissolved salts and minerals. 
     Salt (and fresh water) fisheries are among our most important but far from fully developed reservoirs of protein foods. At present levels of use, this country alone will need an additional 3 billion pounds of fish and shellfish annually by 1980, and many other countries with large-scale protein deficiency can be greatly helped by more extensive use of marine foodstuffs. But all this will require increased efforts, under Federal leadership, for rehabilitation of depleted stocks of salmon and sardines in the Pacific, groundfish and oysters in the Atlantic, lake trout and other desirable species in the Great Lakes, and many others through biological research, development of methods for passing fish over dams, and control of pollution: 
     This Administration intends to give concerted attention to our whole national effort in the basic and applied research of oceanography. Construction of ship and shore facilities for ocean research and survey, the development of new instruments for charting the seas and gathering data, and the training of new scientific manpower will require the coordinated efforts of many Federal agencies. It is my intention to send to the Congress for its information and use in considering the 1962 budget, a national program for oceanography, setting forth the responsibilities and requirements of all participating government agencies.

VI. RECREATION

     America's health, morale and culture have long benefited from our National Parks and Forests, and our fish and wildlife opportunities. Yet these facilities and resources are not now adequate to meet the needs of a fast-growing, more mobile population - and the millions of visitor days which are now spent in Federally-owned parks, forests, wildlife refuges and water reservoirs will triple well before the end of this century. 
     To meet the Federal Government's appropriate share of the responsibility for fulfilling these needs, the following steps are essential: 
     ( A ) To protect our remaining wilderness areas, I urge the Congress to enact a wilderness protection bill along the general lines of S. 174. 
     ( B ) To improve both the quality and quantity of public recreational opportunities, I urge the Congress to enact legislation leading to the establishment of seashore and shoreline areas such as Cape Cod, Padre Island and Point Reyes for the use and enjoyment of the public. Unnecessary delay in acquiring these shores so vital to an adequate public recreation system results in tremendously increased costs. 
     ( C ) For similar reasons, I am instructing the Secretary of the Interior, in cooperation with the Secretary of Agriculture and other appropriate Federal, state and local officials and private leaders to- 
     - formulate a comprehensive Federal recreational lands program; 
     - conduct a survey to determine where additional national parks, forests and seashore areas should be proposed; 
     - take steps to insure that land acquired for the construcion of Federally-financed reservoirs is sufficient to permit future development for recreational purposes; and 
     - establish a long-range program for planning and providing adequate open spaces for recreational facilities in urban areas. 
     I am also hopeful that consistent and coordinated Federal leadership can expand our fish and wildlife opportunities without the present conflicts of agencies and interests: One department paying to have wetlands drained for agricultural purposes while another is purchasing such lands for wildlife or water fowl refuges - one agency encouraging chemical pesticides that may harm the song birds and game birds whose preservation is encouraged by another agency - conflicts between private land owners and sportsmen - uncertain responsibility for the watershed and anti-pollution programs that are vital to our fish and wildlife opportunities. 
     I am directing the Secretary of the Interior to take the lead, with other Federal and State officials, to end these conflicts and develop a long-range wildlife conservation program-and to accelerate the acquisition of upper midwest wetlands through the sale of Federal duck stamps.

CONCLUSION

     Problems of immediacy always have the advantage of attracting notice-those that lie in the future fare poorly in the competition for attention and money. It is not a task which should or can be done by the Federal Government alone. Only through the fullest participation and cooperation of State and local governments and private industry can it be done wisely and effectively. We cannot, however, delude ourselves - we must understand our resources problems, and we must face up to them now. The task is large but it will be done.

JOHN F. KENNEDY


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#50 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 02:31 PM

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50.

 

Statement by the President Following Settlement of the Airway Labor Dispute. 

February 24, 1961

 

I AM GLAD to announce that the parties involved in the present airlines dispute, the Flight Engineers International Association and the Airlines Pilots Association, and the following carriers: Pan American World Airways, American Airlines, Trans World Airlines, Eastern Air Lines, National Airlines, Flying Tiger Lines, have all agreed to the proposal made by the Secretary of Labor on my behalf on Saturday, and that arrangements are now being made for prompt resumption of operations on these airlines. 
     The men are immediately available to return to work. 
     I want to thank all of the parties to the dispute for their cooperation in complying with the request. The Secretary will have a separate statement to make concerning Western Airlines.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

NOTE: A similar statement was recorded for the newsreels in the Fish Room at the White House at 4:30 p.m. on February 23, and was released to the press on that date. The earlier release, entitled "Remarks," differs only in its conclusion, which reads as follows: 
     "I want to thank all of the parties to the dispute for their cooperation in complying with this request, and I am most appreciative to Secretary Goldberg for his efforts in this regard. 
     "I am hopeful that these planes and these air lines will be back at work immediately - and we hope that if their operation schedules permit, by this evening." 
     Secretary Goldberg's statement recommended that the list of air carriers involved in the dispute also include Western Airlines. 
  
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#51 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:28 AM

--

 

51.

 

Joint Statement Following Discussions With Prime Minister Menzies of Australia. 

February 24, 1961

 

PRESIDENT KENNEDY and Prime Minister Menzies met today in Washington to discuss informally a wide range of international problems. The Secretary of State, Mr. Dean Rusk; the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs, Mr. J. Graham Parsons; and the Australian Ambassador to the United States, Mr. Howard Beale; assisted in these discussions. 
     Both the President and the Prime Minister welcome this opportunity to reaffirm the traditional partnership between the peoples of Australia and the United States. 
     In their review of security problems, the President and the Prime Minister reiterated their strong faith in SEATO and ANZUS as bulwarks for the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. They both expressed their willingness to cooperate with all nations to work together for peace and freedom in the world. They recognized the central importance of the United Nations and the Office of the Secretary General in the pursuit of peaceful settlements and pledge their joint support of the efforts now being made by the Secretary General to bring peace to the Congo. They deplored current attempts to twist the tragic events in the Congo into an attack upon the United Nations itself. 
     They welcomed the initiative of King Savang Vatthana proposing a course of action to bring peace, stability and neutrality to Laos, expressing the hope that his efforts will bear fruit. 
     They agreed that efforts must be continued to arrive at an effective agreement under international control in the field of disarmament. 
 


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
 
Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#52 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:29 AM

--

 

52.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House 

Transmitting Bills Implementing the Message on Health and Hospital Care. 
February 24, 1961

  
Dear Mr. ----------------: 
     I am transmitting herewith two drafts of legislation to carry out recommendations I made in my message to the Congress on February ninth. 
 The first bill would, when enacted, increase opportunities for training physicians, dentists and professional public health personnel. These are the keystones of any health program. Yet we are not presently training enough even to keep pace with our growing population. The enclosed proposal will enable us to narrow substantially our current deficit in this area. 
     The other bill which I am transmitting will help expand and improve community facilities and services for the health care of the aged and other persons. It will make possible a substantial addition to the number of nursing home facilities to care for longterm patients and it will help relieve the shortages of home health care programs. 
     The enclosed letters from the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare describe the two proposals in more detail. I commend this legislation to you. 
      Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
    Secretary Ribicoff's letters, dated February 24, 1961, and the draft bills were released with the President's letter. 
 


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
 
Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Research Forum

 
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GooglePlus:
 
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#53 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:29 AM

--

 

53.

 

Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives Proposing a Reduction 

in the Duty-Free Allowance for Returning American Travelers. 
February 24, 1961

Dear Mr. Speaker: 
     In my message of February 6, 1961, I said that the United States faces a balance of payments deficit which is a matter of concern to us and to the whole free world. In order to meet our international responsibilities, to properly formulate domestic economic policies, and to efficiently conduct our economic affairs, we must take into account our balance of payments. 
     I propose that we strengthen our total position and help insure that our gold reserves are employed effectively to facilitate the commerce of the free nations and to protect the stability of their currencies by returning to the historic basic duty-free allowance of $100 allowed returning American travelers. 
     The $100 tariff exemption dates back to 1897. After World War II, however, foreign countries faced a dollar shortage and, as one measure to ease this shortage, Congress increased the tariff exemption by $300 in 1948 and by $100 in 1949, bringing the total exemption to $500. However, in the light of the existing balance of payments problem, this more liberal customs exemption, designed to encourage American expenditures abroad, is not presently warranted. Accordingly, the customs exemption should be returned to the traditional amount. 
     The attached draft of legislation would carry out this recommendation by providing for a return to the $100 duty-free allowance for a four-year period. This proposal would meet the existing situation, and the four-year terminal date would provide an appropriate opportunity for a reappraisal of the measure in the light of the balance of payments position in the future. I urge that Congress give favorable consideration to its prompt enactment. 
    Very truly yours,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: On August 10 the President approved an amendment to the Tariff Act of 1930 providing for a reduction in duty-free allowance for returning American travelers (Public Law 87-132, 75 Stat. 335). 
     The draft bill was released with the President's letter. 
 


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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#54 Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:31 AM

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54.

 

Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives Proposing Exemption of 

Foreign Central Banks From Income Tax on Interest on Government Securities. 
February 24, 1961

 

Dear Mr. Speaker: 
     There is attached a draft of proposed legislation to amend the Internal Revenue Code so that foreign central banks would be exempt from tax on interest they derive from holding obligations issued by the United States Government, if such obligations are held in connection with noncommercial activities of the central bank. 
     This measure is one of various desirable steps, mentioned in my Message to the Congress of February 6, intended to improve this country's ability to defend its gold reserve by offering competitively attractive dollar obligations to foreign central banks. These official "banks of issue" must have unimpaired freedom to purchase gold from the United States, if they prefer to do so, but we should not perpetuate procedures which, in the case of many countries (and particularly the smaller countries) make United States Government securities relatively unattractive as an alternative to holding gold. 
     The legislation would bring about uniform tax treatment of all foreign central banks, many of which are now exempt from tax, either because they are considered an integral part of their government, or because of tax conventions. If foreign central banks keep their dollar assets in time deposits or bankers' acceptances, they are already exempt from tax by statute. Thus, the bill would make Government obligations as attractive to foreign central banks, from a tax standpoint, as bank deposits and bankers' acceptances. 
     A memorandum prepared by the Secretary of the Treasury explaining the bill in greater detail is also attached. 
     It would be appreciated if you would lay the proposed legislation before the House. 
            Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

NOTE: On May 4, 1961, the President approved an amendment to the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 providing for the requested exemption (Public Law 87-29, 75 Stat. 64). 
     The Secretary of the Treasury's memorandum and the draft bill were released with the President's letter. 
 


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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#55 Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:31 AM

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55.

 

Message for the Commission on Civil Rights' Third Annual Conference on Schools in Transition. 

February 25, 1961

[Released February 25, 1961. Dated February 24, 1961]

 

Dr. John Hannah, 
Chairman Commission on Civil Rights 
The Motor House, Williamsburg, Virginia

     Please extend to all the participants of your Third Annual Conference on Schools in Transition my best wishes for a constructive session. The two previous conferences which the Commission has sponsored on the problems of school desegregation have been notable contributions to our national need for better understanding of this vital matter. 
     It is a continuing contribution for you to bring together for an exchange of views the men and women responsible for maintaining our public schools and for carrying through the process of desegregation. 
     Let me here pay tribute to these educators - principals, officers of school boards, and public school teachers. The Constitutional requirement of desegregation has presented them with many new responsibilities and hard challenges. In New Orleans today, as in many other places represented in your three conferences, these loyal citizens and educators are meeting these responsibilities and challenges with quiet intelligence and true courage. The whole country is in their debt for our public school system must be preserved and improved. Our very survival as a free nation depends upon it. This is no time for schools to close for any reason, and certainly no time for schools to be closed in the name of racial discrimination. If we are to give the leadership the world requires of us, we must be true to the great principles of our Constitution - the very principles which distinguish us from our adversaries in the world. 
     Let me also pay tribute to the school children and their parents, of both races, who have been on the frontlines of this problem. In accepting the command of the Constitution with dignity they too, are contributing to the education of all Americans. 
         Cordially,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#56 Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:32 AM

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56.

 

Remarks Recorded for the Television Program "Robert Frost: American Poet." 

February 26, 1961

 

THERE IS a story that some years ago an interested mother wrote to a principal of a school, "Don't teach my boy poetry. He is going to run for Congress." 
     I have never taken the view that the world of politics and the world of poetry are so far apart. I think politicians and poets share at least one thing, and that is that their greatness depends upon the courage with which they face the challenges of life. There are many kinds of courage - bravery under fire, courage to risk reputation and friendship and career for convictions which are deeply held. Perhaps the rarest courage of all - for the skill to pursue it is given to very few men - is the courage to wage a silent battle to illuminate the nature of man and the world in which he lives. This is Robert Frost's courage. Untiring skill and daring which are his in penetrating many of the mysteries which surround our life have brought him a well deserved recognition which has been given to few men in our time. 
     Robert Frost is often characterized as an American poet - or a New England poet. And he is, of course, all of these things, for the temper of his region and of his Nation has provided a good deal of the meter and the tone in which he has dealt. But he is not a poet bounded by geography. He will live as a poet of the life of man, of the darkness and despair, as well as of the hope - which is, in his case, limited by a certain skepticism - and also for his wit and understanding of man's limitations which lie behind all of man's profoundest statements. 
     I asked Robert Frost to come and speak at the inauguration not merely because I was desirous of according a recognition to his trade, but also because I felt he had something important to say to those of us who are occupied with the business of Government, that he would remind us that we were dealing with life, the hopes and fears of millions of people, and also to tell us that our own deep convictions must be the ultimate guide to all of our actions. 
     He has said it well in a poem called "Choose Something Like a Star," in which he speaks of the fairest star in sight and says:

It asks . . . little of us here. 
It asks of us a certain height, 
So when at times the mob is swayed 
To carry praise or blame too far, 
We may choose something like a star 
To stay our mind on and be staid.

For that insight, Robert Frost-and for all the others carved with such toil from a long life - men everywhere are grateful.

 

NOTE: The President's words of appreciation were specially taped for broadcast as part of a television tribute to Robert Frost. During the program, broadcast over the Columbia Broadcasting System at 12:30 p.m. on February 26, Mr. Frost read and discussed his work. 
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#57 Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:33 AM

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57.

 

Remarks at a Meeting With the Board of Foreign Scholarships and 

the U.S. Advisory Commission on Educational Exchange. 
February 27, 1961

AS OUR OWN HISTORY demonstrates so well, education is in the long run the chief means by which a young nation can develop its economy, its political and social institutions and individual freedom and opportunity. There is no better way of helping the new nations of Latin America, Africa, and Asia in their present pursuit of freedom and better living conditions than by assisting them to develop their human resources through education. Likewise there is no better way to strengthen our bonds of understanding and friendship with older nations than through educational and cultural interchange. 
     But as recent task force reports have emphasized, this whole field is urgently in need of imaginative policy development, unification, and vigorous direction. These activities are presently scattered among many agencies of the Federal Government. Only by centering responsibility for leadership and direction at an appropriate place in the governmental structure can we hope to achieve the required results. I shall therefore look to the Secretary of State to exercise primary responsibility for policy guidance and program direction by governmental activities in this field. 
     I am pleased that in carrying these responsibilities the Secretary of State will have the assistance of Philip H. Coombs. His experience in education, government, and philanthropy at home and overseas qualify him well for the position to which he is being appointed.

 

NOTE: The White House release announcing the meeting stated that the President had appealed to the educational community, private foundations, and voluntary organizations to continue and expand their support and activity in the international educational and cultural fields. The release further stated that the President had emphasized the point that these institutions have an enormously important role to play in U.S. foreign relations and in building a foundation for world peace. 
     At the meeting, the release noted, Dr. Robert G. Storey, Chairman of the Board of Foreign Scholarships, and Dr. Franklin G. Murphy, Chairman of the Advisory Commission, reported on the work of their respective groups. The release also noted that Senators Fulbright and Mundt had accompanied the group to the White House, as did Assistant Secretary of State Philip H. Coombs, Robert H. Thayer, Special Assistant to the Secretary, and Saxton A. Bradford, Director of the Department's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#58 Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:34 AM

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58.

 

Special Message to the Congress on the Federal Highway Program. 

February 28, 1961

To the Congress of the United States: 
     Our Federal pay-as-you-go Highway Program is in peril. It is a peril that justifies a special message because of the vital contribution this program makes to our security, our safety and our economic growth. Timely completion of the full program authorized in 1956 is essential to a national defense that will always depend, regardless of new weapon developments, on quick motor transportation of men and material from one site to another. 
     American lives are also dependent on this program in a more direct sense. Better, more modern highways-with less congestion, fewer dangerous curves and intersections, more careful grades and all the rest - mean greater highway safety. It has been estimated that more fatalities will be suffered in traffic accidents between now and 1975, when the new system is fully operative, than were suffered by American troops in every conflict from the Civil War through Korea. Last year witnessed 38,000 traffic fatalities and 1.4 million personal injuries. But on our new expressways the ratio of accidents and deaths per mile driven is only a fraction of what it is on ordinary roads. The Interstate System when completed, it is estimated, will save at least 4,000 lives a year. 
     Finally, proceeding with this program at least as fast as originally scheduled is essential to our economy. This is true not only in terms of the stimulus and employment it provides now, in a time of recession, to such vital industries as steel, construction, cement and others. It is also a key to the development of more modern and efficient industrial complexes - turning marginal land or clogged cities into attractive sites for commercial or industrial development - and to lower motor transportation costs generally. 
     The Bureau of Public Roads estimates that users of the completed Interstate System will save 42,000 years of travel time every year. The elimination of stop-and-go driving will save users 9 billion costly stops and starts every year. 
     A study, for example, of a 16-mile section of the Schuylkill expressway in the Philadelphia area showed direct savings to motorists of over $18 million per year, enough to pay the entire cost in three years. Even less tangible, but equally important, are the widened horizons a modern highway network affords the individual and the family - greater recreational opportunities, greater freedom of choice in places to live, work and play - and less time and effort spent in getting there. 
     It has always struck me as ironic that so many of our citizens - so ingenious in quickly devising ways of ending almost every minor irritant - would so readily tolerate every morning and evening the incredible congestion of our antiquated highways that takes a heavy toll in automotive costs and depreciation, to say nothing of human nerves and tempers. By 1975 - and the Interstate System is required by Congress to have enough lanes to move safely all the vehicles expected in 1975 - there will be an estimated two or three times as many vehicles as use those roads today. Even though some expressways now seem excessively large, an emergency program then will be too late - we must continue to build those highways now at a steady rate sufficient to assure completion on schedule. 
     As early in the era of the automobile as 1916, Congress recognized the Federal responsibility in this area - to promote the national defense, interstate commerce, farm and resource development and postal service. The pay-as-you-build 41,000 mile program initiated in 1956 was the most notable and far-sighted recognition of this responsibility in history. 
     But now, as stated at the outset, that program is in trouble. Revised cost estimates submitted to the Congress early in January reported pursuant to law that to complete the Interstate System on schedule (while meeting the needs of the regular ABC and related primary, secondary and urban Federal aid program) would require, over the life of the program, additional authorizations of $11.56 billion - which means additional revenues to the Highway Trust Fund totaling $9.74 billion, or about $900 million more a year through fiscal 1972 to meet the higher level of expenditures on a pay-as-you go basis. 
     The engineering and construction resources are readily available to absorb this increase and step up the program. To deny the increase would postpone completion of the system to five years beyond the original target date. Moreover, the 1956 Highway Revenue Act sought to implement its pay-as-you-go intention with Sec. 209(g) - generally known as the Byrd Amendment - which requires the authorized apportionments to each state to be reduced whenever Trust Fund revenues are estimated to be insufficient to cover them in any individual year. It is now clear that, despite the scheduled diversion, even the 1963 authorizations under present law, which should be apportioned to the states in July of this year, will have to be substantially cut-back below currently authorized and desired levels by this provision unless Congress acts to increase revenues. 
     I am wholly opposed to either stretching out or cutting back our highway program, and urge the Congress not to rely on either solution. Either step would he unwise at a time when our slump-ridden economy needs greater, not less, construction activity. Either step would be unfair to the individual states who have proceeded in good faith, and in reliance on the Treasury's certification of adequate funds, to make plans and expenditures looking to receiving their full apportionment this July. And to postpone the completion of the Interstate System only further postpones the day when our highways will be adequate to meet our defense, economic and general population increase needs.

I. A NEW PLAN TO FINANCE THE HIGHWAY PROGRAM

     Under present law, the highway use taxes (by which the Highway Trust Fund has been financed in accordance with the 1956 pay-as-you-go intent) are scheduled - not for an increase to meet the problems described above - but for a decline: a drop in the gasoline, diesel and related fuels tax from 4¢ a gallon to 3¢ a gallon on July 1. 
     Such a tax reduction at this time - causing a loss of some $600 million a year - would be wholly contrary to the basic premise on which the 1956 Highway Act was agreed to. Cost reappraisals since enactment of the temporary one cent increase in 1959 demonstrates conclusively that it must be continued, if not further increased. Nor can a reduction now be justified on anti-recession grounds. If tax reductions are deemed necessary to reverse the recession or promote long run economic growth, other tax cuts might prove more effective, or have higher priority. 
     The scheduled reduction in the gas tax, in short, is fiscally unwise. It was vigorously opposed by the previous Administration. It is opposed by this Administration with equal vigor; and I ask the Congress to prevent this gas tax reduction from taking effect on July 1. 
     Those favoring the reduction, or opposed to any increase, cite two principal alternative sources of revenue: 
     (A) Diversion From General Revenues.  Under present law, the revenues from certain excise taxes totalling over $800 million a year are scheduled to be diverted from the General Fund to the Highway Trust Fund for a three-year period beginning July 1. 
     It is asserted by its advocates that this amount will compensate for the reduction in the gas tax. But we are not better able to pay our bills as a nation by merely shifting money from one pocket to another. I am pledged, barring a worsening economy, to submit to the Congress programs (aside from any new Defense outlays) which of and by themselves will not unbalance the Budget previously submitted. This will not be easily done. There will be no margin to spare. Congress, by diverting $800 million of badly needed funds from the General Fund, will be deliberately unbalancing the Budget and creating an $800 million deficit. This is a decision which, if it is taken at all, should be taken on its merits, in relation to the state of the economy and the budget as a whole, not as an accidental by-product of the highway program. 
     The total diversion for three years amounts to some $205 billion - and the precedents and pressures to make it permanent through 1972 could cost the General Fund (and cost the general taxpayers, including competing forms of transportation) approximately $10 billion. 
     It is argued that highway use is related to these excise taxes that are to be diverted (portions of the taxes on the sale of automobiles, parts and accessories). But this program was approved in 1956 on the assumption that these revenues (from taxes which had been in effect in war and peace for more than ten years before the Highway Program was enacted) would remain as always in the General Fund, along with similar excise tax revenues (all of which can theoretically be related to some Federal program but cannot be diverted to support such program). To change the intent of the 1956 Act now only creates a Budget deficit that eventually must be met through new taxes on the general population or a Treasury bond-issue - thus departing from the Program's principle of being financed on a pay-as-you-go basis by the user tax sources then agreed upon. 
     A new argument in favor of this diversion is based upon a Commerce Department cost allocation study stating that 8% of the program's benefits accrue to others than those whose taxes now finance the Trust Fund. The basis of this part of the study is open to serious challenge; but even aside from that, it must be remembered that: 
     ( a ) The Federal Highway Trust Fund is not paying for 100% of this system. A normal portion of ten percent is already borne by the States, reflecting the benefits they receive, and which they are free to raise from non-users if they choose. The Commerce Department Study "makes no suggestion as to the source or level of government which should supply the revenues" for the 8%. 
     ( b ) The proposed diversion of more than $800 million cannot possibly be justified by the 8% figure - which equals only $250 million. 
     ( c ) The Trust Fund already receives nearly $60 million income from non-users: vehicles used off the highways, motor boats, and the like; and at the same time it is not charged with some $40 million worth of other road programs benefiting the highway user but now charged to General Revenues, though their users must pay gas and other taxes into the Trust Fund. 
     In short, there is no justification for unbalancing the Budget by the scheduled diversion of more than $800 million from the General Fund to the Highway Trust Fund; and, again maintaining the position strongly taken by my predecessor, I ask the Congress to prevent this diversion. 
     ( B )  Federal Highway Bond Issues. The other method of financing most commonly suggested in place of the pay-as-you-go principle in this program is the issuance of a special highway bond series. This proposal has important disadvantages. 
     - At the present time, by increasing Government demands on long-term money, special highway bonds would make more difficult the current efforts of the Government to reduce long-term rates to promote economic recovery. 
     - Not only do special bond issues inevitably cost more than regular public debt issues, but such a step would also cost the program an estimated $6.6 billion additional in interest payments ($6.6 billion that would not build a single road), and keep the Trust Fund in being and its revenues tied up through most of fiscal 1981. It is unrealistic to assume that those revenues will not be needed for new highway needs from 1972-1981. As a spokesman for the previous Administration earlier testified in connection with highway financing: "We ought to pay our own way and leave future revenue sources available to meet future needs." 
     - Finally, it is clear that Federal Highway bonds are merely a device to avoid the appearance of deficits and evade the pay-as-you-go principle in this program. A special bond issue is not the answer. 
     Nor is the answer to be found in any other form of Treasury loan - or in charging tolls on roads that ought to be free - or in raising the 10% share of the program now borne by States with no adequate means of paying a higher share. A national program should not be dependent upon the ability and willingness of every State Legislature to increase its contribution. 
     Our objective is to finance this program on a pay-as-you-go basis from those user taxes so designated in 1956, at rates sufficient to pay the full cost of the program, without charge on general Federal revenues. 
     In the absence of a finding that the economy needs stimulus beyond the measures proposed in my previous messages, I cannot recommend that Congress suspend the Byrd Amendment and permit apportionments to be made without reference to estimated revenues. 
     The pay-as-you-go principle, the basic premise of the Act, requires an increase in the revenues from user taxes this year instead of a reduction. Although reduction in these taxes is sought by many State Governments, motor carriers, oil producers and motorists, it is nevertheless clear that a program essential to the nation, and to their own welfare, requires that they cooperate in determining how present sources are to yield the additional revenues needed. 
     - The previous Administration recommended an increase in the present 4¢ tax on gasoline to 4.5¢ a gallon. This is clearly acceptable, and would have my support. However, I prefer not to raise taxes on the general consumer at this time, and to emphasize instead a fairer allocation of the burden among those who use the highways. 
     - I propose as a substitute means of obtaining the same revenue: 
     - Retaining the present gas tax of 4¢ a gallon; and 
     - Increasing the following taxes: 
 

Tax Present Proposed Diesel fuel 4¢ a gallon 7¢ Trucks over 26,000 lbs $1.50 per 1000 lbs $5.00 Highway tires  8¢  10¢ Inner tubes 9¢ 10¢ Tread rubber 3¢ 10¢

     Practically all of the increase in revenues (replacing the general ½¢ rise in gas tax) would come from the heavier trucks that use diesel fuel and weigh over 26,000 lbs. when loaded. This is only fair. Indeed, technical experts in the Bureau of Public Roads advise me that even this increase would not charge heavy trucks their fair share of the cost of this program. 
     Methods of allocating highway costs and benefits among various classes of users have always varied widely. But previous state and Federal studies, as well as those new Commerce Department studies thus far completed, all assign to heavy trucks and tractor-trailer combinations a share of the cost far exceeding that assigned to automobiles and other users. Their size and weight require a thicker surface or structure, a wider pavement and shoulder, more careful grading and more expensive bridges. The 5-axle combination with full trailer was responsible for some 12 times as much of the cost per mile of travel as automobiles traversing the same highways as analyzed by the new study requested by the Congress. 
     In terms of ton-miles traveled, as expected, the study again showed heavy trucks to be the primary beneficiaries of the system. But even in the study of benefits received, there was a large gain to the trucking industry from these new highways: less gas, oil and depreciation expense, less strain on the driver, fewer accidents, and much shorter distances and travel time over improved and widened surfaces with fewer sharp grades and curves, less congested traffic and fewer stops, intersections and access roads. In this study also, truck combinations benefited many times as much as the average automobile driver. 
     Still to be completed is the final study on how much more wear and tear, maintenance and construction costs are due to the large trucks. But on the basis of these three and other studies, it is already clear that passenger cars are paying more than their fair share now - and, as stated in that Report (submitted by Secretary Mueller on January 13, now House Doc. 54), - "There is a definite indication in the results of all three allocation studies that the heavier trucks and combinations (particularly the latter) should be paying considerably more, in relations to the payments by the lighter vehicle groups, than they do now." 
     I urge the Congress to adopt this alternative. If it is rejected, the Congress should be prepared to increase gasoline taxes on all users as recommended by my predecessor. What is essential is that one alternative or another must be adopted to raise the revenues this program needs to go ahead as scheduled without draining general revenues.

II. OTHER TAX AND COST ALLOCATIONS

     The Budget and Trust Fund programs of the previous Administration included two long-standing recommendations on which the proposal submitted above is also based, and in which I join: 
     (1) That the Congress retain aviation fuel tax receipts in the General Fund instead of transferring them to the Highway Trust Fund as is presently done. This is not a highway use tax in any sense - and it is both fair and logical to devote these tax receipts ($22 million for fiscal 1962) to the General Budget which is in need of all available revenues. 
     (2) That the Congress transfer the financing of forest and public land highways to the Highway Trust Fund. There is no reason why this program, of benefit primarily to users, should not be supported by users in the Trust Fund established for that purpose, instead of imposing an estimated $37.5 million burden on general revenues.

III. INCREASE LEVEL OF ABC APPORTIONMENTS

     The financing plan described above and in tables to be submitted to the Congress also provides for a small but significant increase in the authorization of funds for the more traditional highway program - the regular ABC systems of primary, secondary and urban roads. A trunk line network of modern controlled access highways is only as efficient as its connections to home, office, factory and farm. Now fixed at an annual level of $925 million, I recommend that this authorization be increased by $25 million every two years beginning in 1964 until the $1 billion level is reached and maintained.

IV. COORDINATION WITH URBAN DEVELOPMENT

     A Federal Highway program of this scope cannot be isolated from other programs for social and civic improvement, particularly our progress in urban renewal and planning. More effective use of both highway and urban renewal funds can result from increased coordination - as Pittsburgh's Golden Triangle so strikingly demonstrates. I am directing the Secretary of Commerce and the Housing and Home Finance Administrator to increase their joint planning at every level, to improve coordination of urban renewal and freeway construction plans in the same area, and to invite the cooperative efforts of State and local highway and housing officials and private experts. 
     More specific and urgent, however, are the problems of families displaced by new highway construction. As more and more rights-of-way are acquired and construction begins, tens of thousands of families are required to move from their path and find new places to live - more persons displaced, it has been estimated, than are displaced by all our urban renewal and slum clearance programs combined. For many families of modest income, especially those displaced by expressways in congested urban areas, adequate housing is often difficult, if not impossible, to locate at prices or rents which they can afford, or in places reasonably convenient to their jobs. As a result, many are compelled to accept substandard accommodations. Others, by overcrowding otherwise adequate housing, help to create new slums. Those already in substandard housingcrowded into a tenement in the path of a new expressway, for example - are hard-put to find any housing at all, yet are given no help or priority by existing Federal Housing programs. 
     To date this serious problem has been largely overlooked. Neither the Federal Government nor the State highway departments have assumed any positive or explicit responsibility for meeting these needs. 
     In contrast, the Federal urban renewal law, enacted in 1949, requires that every contract for Federal assistance include provisions assuring the availability of decent, safe and sanitary housing at prices they can afford and in suitable locations for all families displaced by urban renewal projects. I urge that the Federal highway law be amended to require similar assurances of help in finding reasonable housing at reasonable costs for all those displaced from their homes by future Federal-aid highway projects. 
     Such a step will lessen costly resistance to needed highway projects and their proper location. We must not allow needed progress in highways to come at the expense of unnecessary personal hardship to American families.

V. BILLBOARD CONTROL

     The Interstate Highway System was intended, among other purposes, to enable more Americans to more easily see more of their country. It is a beautiful country. The System was not intended to provide a large and unreimbursed measure of benefits to the billboard industry, whose structures tend to detract from both the beauty and the safety of the routes they line. Their messages are not, as so often claimed, primarily for the convenience of the motorist whose view they block. Some two-thirds of such advertising is for national products, and is dominated by a handful of large advertisers to whom the Interstate System has provided a great wind-fall. 
     The Congress took a wise though very modest step in 1958 by authorizing, through Section 122 of the 1958 Act, the control of outdoor advertising within designated limits of the routes of the Interstate System. States electing to comply with the Federal standards promulgated under that section were to receive an incentive payment of an extra one-half of 1 percent of the cost of interstate highway projects within the State. 
     Unfortunately that provision expires on June 30th of this year, and a variety of pressures has prevented all but one state (Maryland) from taking advantage of this provision. I urge the Congress to extend this billboard control section for four more years; and to increase the incentive bonus from ½ to 1% of a State's allotment. Should this measure still prove to be insufficient, it may be necessary to adopt more direct means of control, or to at least charge the billboard owners for the benefits they are receiving.

VI. THE HIGHWAY PROGRAM AND THE RECESSION

     As mentioned in my message of February 2nd to the Congress, I ordered at that time the immediate release of $724 million of Federal highway funds which would not normally have been available to the States until April 1st. This was only a first step toward speeding up the highway program. Its effects are limited in terms of new construction immediately put under way but it permitted a number of States to let contracts in March that would have been held up until April or May. 
     If economic conditions warrant, additional steps can be taken by Congress and the Executive, including additional authorization for temporary acceleration for which we already have the plans, men and material ready. Particularly useful at that time, in view of the harsh winter's effects on so many streets and highways, would be authorization of Federal funds for road repair in areas of substantial unemployment. But because of the tight condition of the Trust Fund and General Fund, I shall not make recommendations along these lines unless later appraisal of the state of the economy indicates the necessity of such actions.

CONCLUSION

     The program outlined here faces up to our responsibilities for meeting the highway needs of the nation, while maintaining the original concept of a highway program financed by highway users. It is a realistic program designed to meet an urgent problem. I urge its prompt and impartial consideration.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#59 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:36 AM

--

 

59.

 

Statement by the President Recorded for the Opening of the Red Cross Campaign. 

February 28, 1961

[Broadcast over radio and television at 6 p.m.]

AS PRESIDENT of the United States and in accordance with custom I have designated the month of March as Red Cross Month, and as Honorary Chairman of the Red Cross I do want to ask the support of all of you for this most important drive. 
     The Red Cross has been chartered by the Congress to serve the people. It has come to the aid of our neighbors when they have been struck by hurricanes. It aids our sons or brothers who may be in the service. It helps through its blood banks hundreds and even thousands of Americans who might otherwise have lost their lives if it had not been for the vigilance and the work of the Red Cross. 
     The Red Cross belongs to all Americans and I hope that all Americans will participate in supporting it this month. Over two million volunteers will be crossing the country in search of your support either through the United Fund itself or through the Red Cross drive. 
     This is a traditional work in which all of us have participated throughout all of our lives. It deserves our support in future months. The responsibilities placed upon it by our Government, by nature, by our hospitals, by our needs are great. I hope that all Americans will participate in supporting this year in March the Red Cross.


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
 
Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#60 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 3,063 posts
  • LocationSan Diego, CA

Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:37 AM

--

 

60.

 

Memorandum to Federal Agencies on the Red Cross Campaign. 

February 28, 1961

 

Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies: 
     During the month of March, the American National Red Cross conducts its annual campaign for members and funds. This is one of the three campaigns authorized within the Executive Departments and Agencies. However, those local Red Cross chapters that have raised their financial requirements in federated fund campaigns will not make their appeals at this time. 
     By Act of Congress the Red Cross is required to provide welfare service to members of the armed forces and their families at home and overseas, and to maintain a program of disaster preparedness and relief. It also offers other vital services in the fields of Blood, Home Nursing, First Aid and Water Safety. It provides opportunities for the young people of America to participate in community services which prepare them for positions of leadership in the future. 
     The volunteers and the funds that make this great work possible are provided by the American people. I urge all employees of the Federal Government and the members of the armed forces to continue their generous support of the Red Cross.

JOHN F. KENNEDY


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
 
Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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