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The Public Papers of JFK (in order)


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#21 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 11:58 AM

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21.

 

Exchange of Greetings With Dr. Walter Hallstein, President of the European Economic Community. 

February 4, 1961

[Released February 4, 1961. Dated February 2, 1961]

 

     Dear Dr. Hallstein: 
     I deeply appreciate the kind expression of good wishes extended on behalf of yourself and the Commission of the European Economic Community. 
     It is my sincere hope that the years to come will see further steady progress toward the goals envisaged by the Treaty of Rome, an objective to which the United States will continue to lend its steadfast support. 
     The Government of the United States looks forward to close collaboration with the Commission of the EEC, and to the development of relationships between the European Economic Community and the United States, as well as other countries, which will redound to the benefit of the entire free world.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

[The Honorable Dr. Walter Hallstein, President of the Commission of the European Economic Community, Brussels, Belgium]


NOTE: Dr. Hallstein's message, dated January 20, 1961, follows:

The President 
The White House 
     On occasion of your assumption of office may I on my own behalf and on that of the Commission of the European Economic Community convey our warmest good wishes for the challenging years that lie ahead and for your success in tackling the manifold tasks that face us all. For our part, we look forward to a continuing, ever more fruitful friendship between the United States and the European Community.

WALTER HALLSTEIN


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#22 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:00 PM

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22.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House Transmitting 

Bills Extending Unemployment Benefits and Providing Aid to Needy Children. February 6, 1961

 

     My dear Mr.--------------- 
     I am transmitting herewith two bills: (1) To establish a temporary program for the payment of additional unemployment compensation to workers who have exhausted their State benefits; and (2) To authorize Federal financial participation for a temporary period in State aid to needy children of unemployed parents. I recommended such legislation on February 2 as a part of this administration's program for economic recovery and growth. 
     The need for prompt enactment of this legislation is clear. 
     In January, 5.4 million workers were without jobs. About 3.4 million were receiving unemployment compensation, and about one-half million who had already exhausted their unemployment compensation were still unemployed. 
     Unemployment compensation provides unemployed workers with necessary purchasing power. When this compensation is exhausted the purchasing power ceases. This has a serious impact not only on the worker and his family, but on the economic health of the entire economy. The costs and effects of mass unemployment arising from a national recession clearly reach across State lines. The problem is national in scope, and the Federal Government has the responsibility for taking action as soon as possible to meet it. That is why I propose this temporary program as a first step. The extension of the unemployment compensation program will permit 3 million workers to receive benefits totalling about $950 million. 
     There is also a pressing need for improving our public assistance. Pending completion of a study of a permanent program in this area, we should take action to help the States provide assistance to children whose need results from the unemployment of their parents. In some cases, the unemployment benefits of these parents have been exhausted; in others, such benefits are not payable or are not sufficient to meet the needs of the large family. Therefore, as part of a national temporary program dealing with the problems of the unemployed, some assistance for the children of needy unemployed workers should be provided. 
     The enclosed letters from the Secretary of Labor and the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare describe the legislation in more detail. 
     Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
     The Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation Act of 1961 (Public Law 87-6, 75 Stat. 8) was approved on March 24, 1961 (see Item 93). An amendment to the Social Security Act authorizing Federal financial participation in aid to dependent children of unemployed parents (Public Law 87-31, 75 Stat. 75), was approved on May 8, 1961. 
     Secretary Goldberg's letter of February 3 and Secretary Ribicoff's letter of February 4, together with the draft bills, were released with the President's letter. 
  
  
  
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#23 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:01 PM

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23.

 

Special Message to the Congress on Gold and the Balance of 

Payments Deficit. February 6, 1961

 

To the Congress o f the United States: 
     The gold outflow of the past three years has dramatically focused world attention on a fundamental change that has been occurring in the economic position of the United States. Our balance of payments - the accounting which shows the result of all of our trade and financial relations with the outside world - has become one of the key factors in our national economic life. Mainly because that balance of payments has been in deficit we have lost gold. 
     This loss of gold is naturally important to us, but it also concerns the whole free world. For we are the principal banker of the free world and any potential weakness in our dollar spells trouble, not only for us but also for our friends and allies who rely on the dollar to finance a substantial portion, of their trade. We must therefore manage our balance of payments in accordance with our responsibilities. This means that the United States must in the decades ahead, much more than at any time in the past, take its balance of payments into account when formulating its economic policies and conducting its economic affairs. 
     Economic progress at home is still the first requirement for economic strength abroad. Accordingly, the first requirement for restoring balance in our international payments is to take all possible steps to insure the effective performance of our own economic system - to improve our technology, lower our production and marketing costs, and devise new and superior products, under conditions of price stability. The real wealth of a nation resides in its farms and factories and the people who man them. A dynamic economy producing goods competitively priced in world markets will maintain the strength of the dollar. 
     Thanks to our international reserves we have time, if we use it wisely, in which to strengthen our domestic economy and make it fully competitive with that of other nations. Our situation is one that justifies concern but not panic or alarm. 
     In my message on February 2, I dealt with the measures for reviving our domestic economy. The steps I now propose will strengthen our dollar position and insure that our gold reserves are employed effectively to facilitate the commerce of the free nations and to protect the stability of their currencies. Because these steps supplement the policies for strengthening our domestic economy, and because we can take them calmly and deliberately, they are not for that reason any less important or less urgent. Those that are within the present authority of the Executive will be the subject of vigorous action. Where action by the Congress is required I urge early consideration and approval. 
     For the past decade our international transactions have resulted in a deficit-payments that were in excess of receipts - in every year except that of the Suez crisis, 1957. The surplus of our exports over our imports, while substantial, has not been large enough to cover our expenditures for United States military establishments abroad, for capital invested abroad by private American businesses and for government economic assistance and loan programs. All of these outlays are essential. Our military establishments in foreign countries protect the national security. Private investment promotes world economic growth and trade and, through the return of profits to our country, will strengthen our balance of payments in future years. Our economic assistance programs, much the smallest of these three items in its effect on payments balance, is vital in the continuing struggle against tyranny and oppression, and the poverty on which they feed. 
     Over the period 1951 to 1957 the deficit in our balance of payments averaged about $1.0 billion annually. These did not result in a net outflow of gold from the United States; foreign monetary authorities, banks and private individuals held these earnings as dollars or claims on dollars. Thus our gold reserves were $22.8 billions at the end of 1950 and $22.9 at the end of 1957. But during these years the dollar holdings by foreign countries increased from $8.4 billion at the end of 1950 to almost $15 billion at the end of 1957. 
     These earlier deficits in our balance of payments were, in fact, favorable in their world effect. They helped to restore foreign monetary systems by enabling foreign countries to earn the dollars which they needed to rebuild their international reserves. They made it possible for the industralized countries of Western Europe to restore the convertibility of their currencies, thus freeing world trade and payments from exchange control. This was of benefit to the export trade of the United States. However, this growth in foreign dollar holdings placed upon the United States a special responsibility - that of maintaining the dollar as the principal reserve currency of the free world. This required that the dollar be considered by many countries to be as good as gold. It is our responsibility to sustain this confidence. 
     In 1958 and 1959 the deficit in our balance of payments sharply increased - to $3.5 billion in 1958 and to $3.8 billion in 1959. This came about mainly because of lagging exports and rising imports. There was no significant increase in our outlays for military expenditures, private investment or government economic assistance. However in these years, unlike the period 1951-57, the deficit resulted in large transfers of gold to foreign accounts as well as a further increase in foreign dollar holdings. For the two years together, 1958 and 1959, gold transfers to foreign accounts were $3.0 billion while foreign dollar holdings by foreign countries increased by another $4.3 billion. These gold transfers did not make the underlying balance of payments fundamentally worse. They did reflect a decision by foreigners to take more of their earnings in gold and to hold less in dollars. 
     Last year, 1960, the surplus of our exports of goods and services over our imports increased from $2.2 billion in 1959 to $5.8 billion. This was caused, principally, by an increase - amounting to more than $3 billion - in our exports. This once more reduced what may be called our basic deficit - it was only about $1.5 billion for the year. However, during 1960 there was a large movement abroad of short-term capital. Favorable interest rates abroad, a high rate of growth and good investment prospects in Europe and some speculative fears concerning the future value of the dollar all played a part. It is estimated that this outward flow of short-term funds was between $2 and $2.5 billion, and this was the crucial factor in raising the over-all deficit to $3.8 billion. Of this, $1.7 billion were transferred in the form of gold and $2.1 billion took the form of increased foreign dollar holdings. 
     An outward movement of short-term funds such as that which occurred in 1960 should not be considered a part of the basic deficit. Such movements are quickly reversible in response to changes in interest rates and other business factors here and abroad. Moreover, insofar as short-term funds transferred to foreign financial centers consist of U.S.-owned capital, they create United States claims against the recipient country. In the new era of convertible currencies upon which we have entered, we may expect that short-term money will continue to flow back and forth. I have requested the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury to work for still closer cooperation between the monetary and financial authorities of the industrialized free nations with a view toward avoiding excessive short-term money flows which could be upsetting to the orderly development of international trade and payments. 
     In sum our basic deficit of $1.5 billions is of manageable proportions. And it is this basic deficit which affects the real strength of our currency. But the time has come to end this deficit. It must be ended by responsible, determined and constructive measures. 
     There are other factors which lend basic support to our monetary and financial position. Our gold reserve now stands at $17.5 billion. This is more than 1½ times foreign official dollar holdings and more than 90% of all foreign dollar holdings. It is some 2/5 of the gold stock of the entire free world. 
     Of this $17.5 billion, gold reserves not committed against either currency or deposits account for nearly $6 billion. The remaining $11.5 billion are held under existing regulations as a reserve against Federal Reserve currency and deposits. But these, too, can be freed to sustain the value of the dollar; and I have pledged that the full strength of our total gold stocks and other international reserves stands behind the value of the dollar for use if needed. 
     In addition, the United States has a quota in the International Monetary Fund of $4.1 billion. This can be drawn upon if necessary and our access to the Fund's resources must be regarded as part of our international reserves. 
     Finally beyond its liquid international reserves, the government and citizens of the United States hold large assets abroad. Western European countries whose currencies are now strong owe us long-term governmental debts of $2.9 billion. Our private short-term assets abroad now are estimated at $4½ billion. Our long-term private investments in foreign countries - including both plants owned directly by American companies and securities of foreign business and governments owned by Americans - total over $44 billion, exceeding foreign investments in the U.S. economy by some $28 billion. In any reckoning of international assets and liabilities, the United States has a strong solvent position. 
     In short, powerful resources stand behind the dollar. Our gold and monetary reserves are large; so are the physical and monetary assets we hold throughout the world. And, in the years ahead, if the program I previously outlined is pursued, the dollar will have the added strength of the reviving power of the American economy itself. 
     Certain firm conclusions follow: 
     1. The United States official dollar price of gold can and will be maintained at $35 an ounce. Exchange controls over trade and investment will not be invoked. Our national security and economic assistance programs will be carried forward. Those who fear weakness in the dollar will find their fears unfounded. Those who hope for speculative reasons for an increase in the price of gold will find their hopes in vain. 
     2. We must now gain control of our balance of payments position so that we can achieve over-all equilibrium in our international payments. This means that any sustained future outflow of dollars into the monetary reserves of other countries should come about only as the result of considered judgments as to the appropriate needs for dollar reserves. 
     3. In seeking over-all equilibrium we must place maximum emphasis on expanding our exports. Our costs and prices must therefore be kept low; and the government must play a more vigorous part in helping to enlarge foreign markets for American goods and services. 
     4. A return to protectionism is not a solution. Such a course would provoke retaliation; and the balance of trade, which is now substantially in our favor, could be turned against us with disastrous effects to the dollar. 
     5. The flow of resources from the industrialized countries to the developing countries must be increased. In all that we do to strengthen our balance of payments, we must be especially mindful that the less developed countries remain in a weak financial position. Help from the industrialized countries is more important than ever; we cannot strengthen our balance of payments at the expense of the developing countries without incurring even greater dangers to our national security. 
     6. The United States must take the lead in harmonizing the financial and economic policies for growth and stability of those industrialized nations of the world whose economic behavior significantly influences the course of the world economy and the trend of international payments. 
     To carry forward these policies I propose a program for action, which may be divided into two parts. The first part describes those measures which will improve domestic monetary arrangements and strengthen international cooperation in economic and monetary policy. These measures will help us better to meet short-term demands on reserves such as those of recent years. The measures in the second group are designed to correct the persisting basic deficit in our balance of payments.

I. MEASURES TO EASE THE SHORT-TERM 
DEMAND PROBLEM

1. Measures to Improve International Monetary Institutions.

     Increasing international monetary reserves will be required to support the ever-growing volume of trade, services and capital movements among the countries of the free world. Until now the free nations have relied upon increased gold production and continued growth in holdings of dollars and pounds sterling. In the future, it may not always be desirable or appropriate to rely entirely on these sources. We must now, in cooperation with other lending countries, begin to consider ways in which international monetary institutions - especially the International Monetary Fund - can be strengthened and more effectively utilized, both in furnishing needed increases in reserves, and in providing the flexibility required to support a healthy and growing world economy. I am therefore directing that studies to this end be initiated promptly by the Secretary of the Treasury.

2. Use of United States Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund.

     The United States has never made use of its drawing rights under the International Monetary Fund to meet deficits in its balance of payments. If and when appropriate, these rights should and will be exercised within the framework of Fund policies. The United States will also support continued efforts in the Fund to facilitate drawings by other members in the currencies of industrialized countries whose payments positions are in surplus and whose reserves are large. This will help to reduce the burden now borne by the dollar.

3. Special Interest Rates for Dollar Holdings by Foreign Governments and Monetary Authorities.

     ( a ) The Federal Reserve Act should now be amended to permit the Federal Reserve System to establish separate maxima for rates of interest paid by member banks on time and savings deposits held in this country by foreign governments or monetary authorities (Section 19, paragraph 14).  This authority, when exercised, would enable American banks to make a maximum competitive effort to attract and hold dollar balances which might otherwise be converted into gold. At the same time domestic rates, when desirable for reasons of domestic policy, could be held at a lower level.  I will shortly send to the Congress a draft of the needed legislation. 
     ( b ) I have directed the Secretary of the Treasury to use, whenever it appears desirable, the authority already extended to him by the Second Liberty Bond Act to issue securities, at special rates of interest, for subscription and holding exclusively by foreign governments or monetary authorities. The exercise of this authority could provide an additional inducement to hold foreign official balances in dollars. 
     ( c ) As a final means of holding or attracting foreign dollars, the Congress should enact a measure designed to unify the tax treatment accorded the earning assets of foreign central banks. At present, income derived by foreign central banks of issue from bankers acceptances and bank deposits is exempt from tax under section 861 of the Code. Income from United States Government securities, however, is taxable to foreign central banks in the absence of applicable tax treaty provisions or a special ruling exempting a particular bank from taxation under particular circumstances. Suggested legislation will shortly be forthcoming.

4. Prohibition on Holding of Gold Abroad by Americans.

     The recent Executive Order forbidding the holding of gold abroad by Americans will be maintained. It was fully justified on grounds of equity. It will also help to prevent speculation in the gold market. I am directing the Secretary of the Treasury to keep me advised on steps being taken for effective enforcement. I place everyone on notice that those few American citizens who are tempted to speculate against the dollar will not profit in this manner.

II. MEASURES TO CORRECT THE BASIC PAYMENTS DEFICIT AND ACHIEVE LONGER-TERM EQUILIBRIUM

1. Action by the Senate to Approve the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

     I earnestly request early action by the Senate approving United States membership in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD, in which the industrialized countries of Western Europe, the United States and Canada will be joined, is of vital importance for assisting, on a cooperative basis, the developing countries of the free world. It will also provide a solid framework within which we can carry out intensive and frequent international consultations on the financial and monetary policies which must be pursued in order to achieve and maintain better balance in the international payments position.

2. Export Promotion.

     The Department of Commerce will provide energetic leadership to American industry in a drive to develop export markets. Firms and industries will be encouraged to step up their efforts to develop exports and given every assistance in doing so. As American industry comes to realize the vital role of export earnings for our foreign policy, I have little doubt of its response. 
     We will promptly increase our commercial representatives and facilities abroad. This is a joint program of the Departments of Commerce and State which must proceed with drive and conviction in order to produce effective results. The budget which has already gone to Congress requests $1,250,000 for the State Department to add 41 Foreign Service Commercial Attaches overseas, together with 48 experienced foreign nationals and supporting American staff. 
     The new budget requests will also allow an increase in overseas commercial facilities. The Commerce Department is doubling its Trade Mission program from 11 to 18 per year and will provide more useful information to our overseas posts. I am ordering rapid completion of our two new foreign trade centers at London and Bangkok and have requested the departments to explore whether three more could be added next year in Africa, Latin America and Europe.

3. Cost and Price Stabilization.

     Our export promotion efforts, no matter how well devised or energetically pursued, will not be effective unless American goods are competitively priced. Our domestic policies - of government, of business and of labor - must be directed to maintaining competitive costs, improving productivity and stabilizing or where possible lowering prices.  Measures to achieve these ends which are important for the domestic economy are even more vital for our international competitive position. I have already stated my intention of creating an Advisory Committee on Labor and Management Policy to encourage productivity gains, advance automation and encourage sound wage policies and price stability.

4. Export Guarantees and Financing.

     Our Export-Import Bank must play an increasingly important role in our export promotion efforts. Last year the Export-Import Bank announced a widening of the facilities which it offers for extending credit to American exporters. Despite the improvements made, these facilities are not yet adequate, nor are they comparable to those offered by foreign countries, especially those offered to small and medium- sized exporting concerns and those offered for the financing of consumer goods. I am directing the President of the Export-Import Bank, by April 1, to prepare and submit to the Secretary of the Treasury, as Chairman of the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Problems, a new program under the Export-Import Bank to place our exporters on a basis of full equality with their competitors in other countries. Also, I have asked the Secretary of the Treasury to initiate and submit by the same date a study of methods through which private financial institutions can participate more broadly in providing export credit facilities.

5. Foreign Travel to the United States.

     Foreign travel to the United States constitutes a large potential market hitherto virtually untapped. American travelers annually spend some $2 billion in foreign countries. Foreign travelers only spend about $1 billion in this country. Economic conditions in many foreign countries have improved to the point where a strong travel promotion effort by this country can be expected to yield significant results. The Department of Commerce, in cooperation with the Departments of State and Treasury, will announce shortly a major new program to encourage foreign travel in the United States along the lines envisaged in S. 3102, introduced by Senator Magnuson at the last session of the Congress. This program will include the establishment of travel offices abroad; new advertising campaigns; action to simplify our visa and entry procedures for temporary visitors; and efforts to relax foreign restrictions on travel to the United States. The program will be energetically administered in the Department of Commerce. I am asking the Secretary of Commerce to report in full on plans and prospects by April 1.

6. Agricultural Exports.

     Our agricultural industry, which is of unparalleled efficiency, must make its full contribution to our payments balance. I am directing the Secretary of Agriculture to report on all feasible and internationally desirable means of expanding our exports of farm products, and to emphasize the need for export expansion as a primary objective of our new farm programs.

7. Policy on Economic Assistance.

     Our foreign economic assistance programs are now being administered in such a way as to place primary emphasis on the procurement of American goods. This assistance, accompanied as it is by the export of American products, does not therefore have a significantly adverse effect on our balance of payments. (Not more than 20% of the funds expended for economic grants, development loan assistance, technical assistance and contributions to international organizations, which amounted to $2.6 billion in 1960, is today available for expenditures outside the United States, and we intend to keep an even closer review of these items.) These restrictions will be maintained until reasonable over-all equilibrium has been achieved. Then the United States will discuss with other capital-exporting countries the desirability of instituting common policies for world-wide procurement in the administration of economic development or assistance programs.

8. Tariffs, Restrictions and Discriminations Against American Exports.

     Quota discriminations against American exports have largely disappeared with the return of currency convertibility. We will press for prompt removal of the few restrictions that still exist, as well as for the maximum liberalization of remaining nondiscriminatory quotas in other industralized countries, which apply mainly to agricultural exports. In the tariff negotiations now going forward under GATT we shall seek the fullest possible measure of tariff reduction by foreign countries to the benefit of our exports.

9. Promotion of Foreign Investment in the United States.

     We shall press those Western European countries with strong reserve positions to eliminate the restrictions they still maintain limiting the opportunities for their citizens to invest in the United States and other foreign countries. Also, we are initiating, through the Department of Commerce, a new program to bring investment opportunities in the United States to the attention of foreign investors in the industrialized countries.

10. Abuse of "tax havens." Taxation of American Investment Abroad.

     I shall recommend that the Congress enact legislation to prevent the abuse of foreign "tax havens" by American capital abroad as a means of tax avoidance. In addition, I have asked the Secretary of the Treasury to report by April 1 on whether present tax laws may be stimulating in undue amounts the flow of American capital to the industrial countries abroad through special preferential treatment., and to report further on what remedial action may be required. But we shall not penalize legitimate private investment abroad, which will strengthen our trade and currency in future years.

11. Foreign Assistance Contribution to the Less Developed Countries and the Common Defense.

     It is indispensable that the industrialized countries of the free world join in undertaking systematic budgetary contributions for economic assistance to the less developed countries and the common defense. These contributions should be fully commensurate with their economic and financial positions. Some countries are fulfilling this responsibility; it is a matter of disappointment that others have not yet undertaken to do so. Such actions are important in the short run to achieve a better balance in international trade and payments. Even more important, they are essential to the continuing and effective discharge of our common responsibilities for free world security, economic growth and stability.

12. Reduction of Customs Exemption for Returning American Travelers.

     After World War II, as part of our efforts to relieve the dollar shortage which then plagued the world, Congress provided for two additional increases of $300 and $100 in the duty-free allowance for returning travelers, for a total of $500. The primary purpose for this change having vanished, I am recommending legislation to withdraw this stimulus to American spending abroad and return to the historic basic duty-free allowance of $100.

13. Centralized Review of Dollar Outlays.

     Through the Bureau of the Budget, it has long been our sound financial practice to centralize the review of total spending of the Departments and Agencies of the Government of the United States, including their spending abroad. Under present circumstances, foreign outlays must be examined in a new perspective. Accordingly, I am instructing the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to develop special procedures for analyzing that part of the requests of departments and agencies for spending authority which will involve overseas outlays to insure that our budgetary decisions will be taken with full understanding of their projected impact on the country's balance of payments.

14. U.S. Military Expenditures Abroad.

     National security expenditures abroad constitute one of the largest items in the outflow of dollars, amounting to about $3.0 billion a year. We must maintain a fully effective military force wherever necessary and for as long as needed. While it is clear that we must exercise maximum prudence in our dollar outlays abroad, it has become clear that the present limitation on dependents was not the best way to accomplish this savings, and that this limitation was seriously hurting morale and recruitment in the armed forces. At the same time, the Secretary of Defense has informed me that equivalent dollar savings could be made through other measures, including limitations on expenditures abroad by military personnel for tourism and the purchase of durable consumer goods. Accordingly I have directed him to rescind the limitation on dependents and instead to put these measures into effect immediately. 
     I have also asked him to review the possibilities for savings in the logistic support of our forces, including the combined use of facilities with our allies. We shall also, where appropriate, urge the purchase of the newer weapons and weapons systems by those of our allies who are financially capable of doing so. We shall continue the policy inaugurated last November of emphasizing United States procurement for our military forces abroad wherever practicable, even though some increased budgetary cost may be incurred. Since foreign procurement of this nature has amounted to almost $1 billion a year, significant savings in dollar outflow can be expected - and I am asking the Secretary of Defense to report on these and the other savings by no later than April 1st, to see if further steps are needed then.

 

CONCLUSION

     These measures, combined with increasing confidence in the dollar abroad and steady economic growth at home, can cure the basic long-term deficit in our balance of payments and check the outflow of gold. They symbolize a new dimension of this nation's foreign and domestic economic policies - a new area of difficult problems - but they are problems which can be met by forceful and timely legislative and executive action.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#24 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:03 PM

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24.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House Transmitting a Minimum Wage Bill. 

February 7, 1961

[Released February 7, 1961. Dated February 6, 1961]

 

My dear Mr.---------- 
     I am transmitting herewith a draft of a bill to extend the coverage of the Fair Labor Standards Act and to increase the minimum wage. This bill provides needed improvements in the Fair Labor Standards Act, and I urge its prompt consideration. It is designed to carry out a recommendation contained in my message on February 2 to the Congress. 
     The bill would bring within its protection 4 3/10 million additional workers and would increase the minimum hourly rate of those already protected by the act to $1.25. This will be done by a series of annual adjustments which have been carefully set at levels to which employers can readily adjust. 
     Our nation can ill afford to tolerate the growth of an under-privileged and underpaid class. Substandard wages lead necessarily to substandard living conditions, hardship and distress. Since the last increase in the minimum wage both living costs and productivity have increased to such an extent that the proposed bill merely reflects an adjustment to keep pace with these factors.
     I am also enclosing the letter I received from the Secretary of Labor commenting briefly upon the provisions in the draft bill. 
         Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
     The Fair Labor Standards Act amendments (Public Law 87-30, 75 Stat. 65) was approved May 5, 1965 (see Item 169). 
     The text of Secretary Goldberg's letter of February 6 and the draft bill, released with the President's letter, are published in the Congressional Record (vol. 107, Feb. 7, 1961, p. 1729). 
 


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
 
Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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#25 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:04 PM

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25.

 

The President's News Conference of February 8, 1961


 

    THE PRESIDENT. Good morning. I have several brief announcements. 
     [ 1.] One, I would like to announce that I have invited the Prime Minister of Canada, the Right Honorable John G. Diefenbaker, to make a brief visit to Washington, on Monday, February 20, for discussion of matters of mutual interest to our two countries. I particularly am glad he is coming. We will hold a luncheon in his honor at the White House. I think it is most important that harmonious relations exist between two old friends, and therefore I am glad to have this chance to visit with the Prime Minister. 
     [ 2.] Secondly, I do want to say a word or two about NATO. This is our central and most important defensive alliance, but in the larger sense it is much more. The members of NATO must be leaders also in and out of NATO itself, in such great causes as the integration of Europe and the cooperative development of new nations. We for our part mean to go on as full and energetic partners in NATO, and in particular we wish to maintain our military strength in Europe. Secretary Rusk is making an especially careful study of our policy in this great organization and I am delighted to say that he will have the help not only of Ambassador Finletter, but of an advisory group under the direction of one of the true founders of NATO, a distinguished former Secretary of State, Mr. Dean Acheson. 
     [ 3.] Three, with the approval of Secretary Ribicoff, I am directing the Surgeon General to organize and establish within the Public Health Service a Child Health Center, to deal with the special health problems of children. This is a matter of particular interest to me. Some 400,000 babies are born each year with congenital malformations. I don't think as a country, nationally, and as a matter of fact I don't think probably privately we have done enough on research into the causes of mental retardation. And while a good deal of effort is being expended in this country for the care of these children, I do think it is most important that we devote special effort in the coming months and years to research in the causes of it. I am therefore delighted that we are going to proceed ahead with Governor Ribicoff's strong support. 
     Thank you. 
     [ 4.] Q. Mr. President, in the past 24 hours there has arisen a somewhat hard to understand situation concerning the missile gap. An official of your administration, who was identified in some newspapers this morning as Secretary McNamara, has been quoted as saying that the missile gap which was expected and talked about so much did not exist, nor did he see prospects of it. Your press secretary, yesterday afternoon, denied this story. Now, I wonder if you can set the record clear, if you can tell us your version of what Secretary McNamara said, and what your feelings are about the missile gap. Does it exist, and how and where does it exist? 
     THE PRESIDENT. My only conversation with Mr. McNamara was not at any off-the-record meeting, if such a meeting took place, but was in a conversation which I had with him yesterday afternoon after the reports appeared. 
     Mr. McNamara stated that no study had been concluded in the Defense Department which would lead to any conclusion at this time as to whether there is a missile gap or not. In addition, I talked this morning to Mr. Hitch, who is the Comptroller of the Defense Department, who has been given the responsibility by the Secretary of Defense to conduct a review of our strategic weapons in the same way that Mr. Nitze is conducting a review of our tactical weapons. Mr. Hitch informed me that no study has been completed on this matter. He hoped to have a preliminary study completed by February 20th, but he did tell me quite specifically that as of today he is not prepared to make a judgment as to our capacity in strategic weapons. 
     There are many complicated problems involved. We have the realization that the United States will not strike first, and, therefore, we have to consider what will be available to the United States if an attack took place upon us, not only in missiles, but also in the other arms of our arsenal, SAC, the Navy, Polaris, and all the rest. 
     So I think in answer to your question, the study has not been completed. It has not come, therefore, across my desk. There will be a study of how the budget for fiscal 1961 and 1962 should be changed in view of our strategic position, but that study will not be completed by either Mr. Nitze or Mr. Hitch, or come across Mr. McNamara's desk to be passed to me, for some days. 
     Q. Well, sir, during the campaign you seemed to feel very strongly that a serious missile gap did exist then. Do you now feel as strongly? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, what I hope to do is to wait until the Defense Department who I have given this responsibility to, Mr. McNamara, and he has passed the responsibility to members of his department - I hope that we will have a clearer answer to that question. Of course, it is my hope that the United States is fully secure. I will be pleased if that is the result. If it isn't, I think it is important that we know about it, and I will say that we will then - I will then take on the responsibility of passing on to the Congress this collective judgment as to our position and what needs to be done. 
     So that without getting into the discussion of these stories this morning, I do want to say that it is my information that these studies are not complete, and therefore it would be premature to reach a judgment as to whether there is a gap or not a gap. 
     [ 5.] Q. Mr. President, could you tell us what you think about the wisdom - the idea of - these background news briefings where governmental officials do not identify themselves as distinguished from this type of wide-open news conference? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, they are hazardous in many cases - [laughter] - and I think our Mr. McNamara might agree with that now. On the other hand, I will say that they are important, too. I'd hope it would be possible to work out some satisfactory system where reporters who are charged with covering matters which are particularly complicated, where they would have a chance to discuss with the responsible official on a background basis so that their stories would be more accurate. I believe there have been such conversations in this administration already and they have been, I think, useful. This one, evidently a controversy has arisen from it, but I hope that it will be possible for the responsible officials and the reporters who are particularly concerned with that area, to work out ground rules so that they could be continued. 
     [ 6.] Q. Mr. President, in keeping with your statement about NATO, could you tell us how you would look upon a heads of government meeting of the NATO Council in the near future? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I would not be able to give you a response to that. There is a planned meeting I believe at Oslo, of the foreign ministers, in May. I have seen newspaper reports that it might be turned into a heads of state meeting. But I must say that there has been no judgment reached; I think it is fair to say that the matter is not as yet under consideration. 
     [ 7.] Q. Mr. President, you said during one of your recent messages that this Nation was rapidly approaching its hour of maximum danger or peril - I forget the exact words. Some people have suggested that perhaps you were painting the picture blacker than it is for shock purposes. Could you perhaps spell out for us this morning what you have in mind, and whether you really sincerely feel that we are approaching this peril as you said? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I sincerely believe what I said in my State of the Union Address about our position in the world. I hold this office for the next 4 years, and I believe that the next 4 years will be years in which this country and its capacity to maintain its position and security will be strongly tested. I think that anyone who looks at the globe and looks at the increasing power of the Communist bloc, the belligerency which marks the bloc, particularly the Chinese Communists, I would say would come to the conclusion that we are going to be severely tested in the next 4 years. 
     [ 8.] Q. Mr. President, 3 months ago a Federal court in New Orleans ordered two public schools there desegregated. Since then, what is apparently an organized campaign of intimidation has kept most white children out of those schools and effectively frustrated the court order. 
     During the campaign you spoke of using your moral authority as President in the civil rights field. Can you tell us what you plan to say or do to help the New Orleans families who evidently want to obey the Constitution but are afraid to do so? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I will - at such time as I think it is most useful and most effective, I will attempt to use the moral authority or position of influence of the Presidency in New Orleans and in other places. I want to make sure that whatever I do or say does have some beneficial effect and, therefore, it is a matter which we are considering. 
     Q. But you do not have anything to say specifically about New Orleans today or about what has happened there - for example, last week the man who had tried to send his children to school and then in fear left town? 
     THE PRESIDENT. We are going to - I will comment. As far as New Orleans goes, it is my position that all students should be given the opportunity to attend public schools regardless of their race, and that is in accordance with the Constitution. It is in accordance, in my opinion, with the judgment of the people of the United States. So there is no question about that. 
     Now specifically, what we could most use fully do in order to provide an implementation of the court decision in New Orleans that is a matter which we are carefully considering. On the general question, there is no doubt in my view: students should be permitted to attend schools in accordance with court decisions. The broader question of course is, regardless of the court decisions I believe strongly that every American should have an opportunity to have maximum development of his talents, under the most beneficial circumstances, and that is what the Constitution provides. That is what I strongly believe. 
     On the question specifically of what we can usefully do in New Orleans in order to provide a more harmonious acquiescence with the court decision, I would feel that we could perhaps most usefully wait until we have concluded our analysis of it. 
     [ 9.] Q. Mr. President, the Congress has spent a good deal of time investigating regulatory agencies and Executive interference in them. Now, your assistant, Mr. Landis, has suggested that a White House office be set up to oversee these agencies. Do you feel this might lead to the same kind of Executive interference that the Congress has been investigating? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Mr. Landis recommended such a White House office in his study. I have asked Mr. Landis to come to the White House, not to fill such an office, of course, which is not established, but merely to work with the White House and with the interested members of Congress who are concerned about improving our regulatory procedures. 
     He is going to stay some months and do that. I conferred yesterday with Congressman Harris, who has a special responsibility as Chairman of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, and we are going to continue to work together to try to speed up the procedures of the regulatory agencies and improve their actions. 
     Whether we should have such a White House liaison or center is a matter which we are going to consider. The Congress bears special responsibility for these agencies, and, therefore, I think it is probably not likely that major responsibility in this area would be released to the White House, and I am not completely sure it is wise. 
     [ 10.] Q. Sir, this question is a bit on the personal side. You have available to you at the Catoctin Mountains in Maryland a very fine weekend retreat that has been used by former Presidents. Sir, do you plan to use it and if so, do you plan to rename it back to Shangri-La? And also I believe you have two Government yachts at your disposal. Do you plan to use them, too, sir? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I am not going to use the yachts at the present time. [Laughter] I don't plan to use Camp David very often. Now, I will keep - I think the name should be kept Camp David. But I doubt if I will go there very often. On the question of the yachts, we will have to wait and see what the situation is. I believe we have the Barbara Anne, and I am not familiar with the other yacht. 
     [11.] Q. Mr. President, there is a report from Australia this morning, quoting an American scientist as saying that we will have a man in space within 6 weeks. I wonder if you have ordered an acceleration of our space program, or if you consider it for psychological or other reasons that we are in a race with the Russians to get a man into space? 
     THE PRESIDENT. No, in the first place, I don't know anything about that report. We are very concerned that we do not put a man in space in order to gain some additional prestige and have a man take disproportionate risk, so we are going to be extremely careful in our work and even if we should come in second in putting a man in space, I will still be satisfied if when we finally do put a man in space his chances of survival are as high as I think that they must be. 
     [ 12.] Q. Mr. President, it has been rather reliably reported that you and some of your staff members and Cabinet members were quite active on the Hill by phone and otherwise in the recent rules fight. Could you give us your views as to what your activity and that of your Cabinet members and staff members will be in the coming legislative year, as far as getting your program going? 
     THE PRESIDENT. We have a liaison officer, Mr. O'Brien, and he has Mr. Wilson who is liaison for the House and Mr. Manatos who is liaison for the Senate, and we will attempt to keep close contact between the White House and the House and the Senate in order to give our program the best possible chance that it has to pass. So we will keep very close contact with the Hill, and I hope that they will be harmonious. 
     [ 13.] Q. You said in the past that the release of the two fliers recently helped in our relations with the Soviet Union. Would you care to outline for us, sir, any developments you might hope to take place prior to any possible future summit meeting with Mr. Khrushchev? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I said that it removed a serious obstacle to harmonious relations with the Soviet Union, the release of the fliers. Mr. Thompson arrives back this week, and I am going to meet with Mr. Thompson on several occasions this week - on Saturday morning with Mr. Thompson, Mr. Bohlen, and Mr. Kennan - to help chart our future relations with the Soviet Union. There are some things that I think could usefully be done, and must be done if our relations are going to continue to be fruitful. We are concerned, as I am sure they are, with the situation in Laos. We are concerned with the situation in the Congo, as I am sure they are, and I am hopeful that we can make our position clear to them, and accomplish some useful result. 
     [ 14.] Q. Mr. President, the Mexican Americans are very concerned because you have not named one of them to a high place in your administration. They say that they are the only ethnic group that worked for you nationally, in the "Viva Kennedy" clubs and GI forums, that has not been recognized. I wonder if you plan to give them some recognition? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, we have, I think, Dr. Garcia, from the State of Texas, who I believe has gone with Ambassador Whitney to Jamaica this weekend. We did offer a position of responsibility to an American of Mexican extraction who was unable to accept it, but it was a position of high responsibility. 
     I quite agree with you that we ought to use what I consider to be a great reservoir of talent, and I think this is particularly true in our relations with Latin America. So I will just say to you that it is a matter of interest and that we will continue to see if we can provide for - if we can associate them with our administration more closely. 
     [ 15.] Q. Mr. President, last weekend the Russians launched a 7-ton satellite in orbit which they said was a test of a new rocket. This has led to worldwide speculation that there might have been a man aboard. What do we know about this Russian rocket and about the recent rumored Russian attempts to launch a man into space? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I have no information about - that there was a man involved. We have no evidence that there was a man in the rocket. We have, of course, some information, a good deal of which has appeared in the press, about the rocket. And it is a large one and it may be part of their experiments leading up to placing a man in space. But at least as of now we have no evidence that there is a man in there. But I am sure that they will continue these experiments leading up to placing one there. 
    [ 16.] Q. Mr. President, in your message to Congress on the gold problem, there was one passage in there in which you referred to interest rates on foreign funds which had a sentence that might lead to the presumption that perhaps you had in mind submitting legislation which would give you a little more authority over domestic interest rates in other fields. Is this a reasonable conclusion? Do you have any intention to expand the authority of the Presidency with respect to domestic interest rates? 
     THE PRESIDENT. No. As you - we have had consultations with the Federal Reserve Board about what action should be taken to provide that the interest rate on short-term securities would not come down while the interest rate - which does affect the gold flow - while the interest rate on long-term securities remains high, which does adversely affect the economy. 
     But what, of course, we are interested in is to see the short-term rates remain high enough to protect our gold, while the long-term rates be reduced somewhat in order to stimulate the economy. But this is a matter under the control, of course, directly, of the Federal Reserve Board, with the Treasury having, of course, a direct interest in it. 
     But it is not intended, to answer your question, that we would propose any legislation or any Executive orders which would increase our control directly over long-term rates. 
    [ 17.] Q. Mr. President, in regard to NATO, have you looked into the problem or the recommendation of the previous administration that NATO be given its own nuclear weapons, or will this be left up to the Acheson group, and when will that group be expected to report? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, that was one of the matters, of course, which General Norstad briefly discussed. It is a matter now which is being reviewed by Ambassador Finletter with the aid of Mr. Acheson. That is one of the, I would say, central matters of interest to us now, and both of these men will be working on it. 
     Q. When will that group report to you, approximately? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I haven't got a time on it, but I think we ought to move with some speed in it. 
    [ 18.] Q. Mr. President, the States now can set their own safety and regulatory standards for atomic industrial development within their own borders. Critics of this do-it-yourself provision believe that it increases the danger of nuclear accidents and favor complete Federal control within these areas. Would you give us your views on it? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I will have to look into it. I am not informed about it. 
     [ 19.] Q. Sir, in all the discussions about the gold problem, there keeps coming back West Germany doing more of its share in aiding underdeveloped areas and taking on more commitments in the common defense. Is your administration making representations either through the Treasury Department or through our Ambassador to get the Germans to do more in these fields?
     THE PRESIDENT. Yes. 
     Q. Could you elaborate on it, sir? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I think that the proposals that have been made, of course, in our opinion do not meet the problem or the opportunity, and I am hopeful that we can work out a more satisfactory arrangement with the West Germans. 
     Mr. von Brentano is going to be in the United States, the Foreign Minister, in the month of February. I do hope to see him. In addition, we are considering other methods which could put these negotiations on perhaps a more - a higher level. 
     Q. Just to follow that up, sir, could you spell out what you mean by "higher level"? Are you finding that you are running into problems with them because of their upcoming election? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, they have a good many responsibilities and problems of their own. In addition to whatever they do in relation to us they have other responsibilities to the French and the British. So in fairness, I must say the matter is not wholly easy for the Germans. However, it is a matter of great importance and I therefore think it might be useful to provide that these discussions should take place on a higher level than they have in the past. 
     [ 20.] Q. Mr. President, you spoke during the campaign about the need of getting things moving again. I wonder if you could tell us how well you think you have succeeded so far in creating a new mood in Washington? 
     THE PRESIDENT. As far as the domestic economy or as far as generally? 
     Q. Putting some urgency into it. 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I think we have talented people in our Washington group who are giving it a great deal of time and attention. And therefore I am hopeful - though we have been in office only 2½ weeks - I am hopeful that before the snow is off the ground that we will have been able to stimulate action in a variety of areas. 
     [ 21.] Q. Mr. President, in your State of the Union Address, you remarked that morality in private business has not been sufficiently spurred by morality in public business. In the light of the economy-sized malpractice revealed by - carried on by some of the American leading corporations, would you care to comment on this situation and the impact of such private business morality or immorality on the community itself? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, having participated in the investigation of improper practices in the labor-management field for 2 or 3 years, and having had a good deal of public attention given to it, I am hopeful that the Department of Justice, the Antitrust Division which was very effectively led in recent months, and other agencies of the Government will concern - and the Congress - will concern itself about the problem of conflicts of interest and monopolistic practices, as well as even more illicit practices conducted in the American business community. And I hope that the business community itself will consider what steps it could take in order to lift this shadow from its shoulders. 
     Q. Do you feel, sir, that perhaps business might well establish codes of ethical practice such as the trade unions have established? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Yes. I am hopeful that the unions will live up to these ethical practices which state a very high standard for them; and I think it would be very beneficial if business groups today would consider what they could do to protect themselves from charges of conflicts of interest of the kind that we have recently seen, and also of the effort made by these large electrical companies to defraud the Government. And I must say I would be interested to watch what progress they can make in that area. 
     [ 22.] Q. Mr. President, Admiral Burke's speech was originally checked out and cleared of certain things which I believe Mr. Salinger said might have been sources of unnecessary friction with the Soviet Union. Some Republicans in Congress charged that this was appeasement. Could you sketch in for us the rather difficult ground between appeasement and "unnecessary friction"? 
     THE PRESIDENT. No. All I would say is that I would hope that those who make speeches in the area of national security, Chiefs of Staff and others, and all others, would attempt to have those speeches coordinated with the Department of State and with the White House, so that we can make sure that those speeches represent national policy. I must say it seems to me that Theodore Roosevelt set a very good standard for us all, and one which I hope this administration will follow by speaking softly and maintaining--- 
    [ 23.] Q. Mr. President, on Monday Mr. Rusk said that the United States was prepared to take cooperative action with the other American Republics to end tyranny, he said, against either the left or the right. Is it contemplated that we shall ask the other American States to join with us in some steps on the Cuban problem? 
     THE PRESIDENT. The Cuban problem and the problem of tyranny throughout all of Latin America is a matter which is of course of special concern to Mr. Berle and his group - interdepartmental group - and they have not concluded their analysis as yet. 
    [ 24.] Q. Mr. President, Castro is reported to have built a new radio station, one of the largest in the hemisphere, which will begin operations within a few months to broadcast pro-Castro propaganda throughout Latin America. Is there anything we can do or plan to do to counter this? 
     THE PRESIDENT. We are giving the matter of Cuba and its export of its revolution throughout Latin America a matter of high priority. I could not state what actions will be taken yet until Mr. Berle, Mr. Mann, and Mr. Rusk have concluded their deliberations, which are now going ahead very intensively. 
     [ 25.] Q. Mr. President, one of your task forces recommended that you be given discretionary power within limits to cut tax rates as a counter-cyclical device. Can you tell us what you think of this idea? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, in 1958 there were two proposals to cut taxes. One was made in March and I believe the other was made in June. I voted against it in March and voted for it in June, because it seemed to be, according to the economists I talked to, to be helpful. As you remember, I don't think it got more than 23 or 24 votes. The recession was serious and we ended up with a $12 billion deficit. Now we are going to take another look at the economy in April and make a judgment at that time whether we can expect an upturn in the spring or in the summer. 
     I will say that I am not convinced at the present time that Congress would entertain that proposal, and I would not make it at the present time because I do think we should have more experience and more perspective on the state of the economy before making a proposal which is quite far-reaching, and which would cost the Federal budget perhaps $4 or $5 billion, which is a serious matter and which would limit, perhaps, our ability to go ahead with other programs which in the long run may be more useful. If you have a tax cut, it may last 6 months, if the Congress should grant it, and you lose $5 billion, which is put back into the economy and expended. With $5 billion or $3 billion devoted to education or health or international security, you can produce a longer range result. So that this is a matter which must be considered from various perspectives. In any case, in April we will try to make another judgment on the state of the economy. What I am concerned about is that the economy will move along, using less than capacity, and it is extremely difficult to take steps which will provide quickly for it to operate at full capacity. 
     What we are concerned about is that with the tremendous increase in automation that it's possible for business profits to remain substantial and yet for employment to lag. The fact that the steel companies were able to maintain rather substantial profits at a time when they are operating at less than 50 percent of capacity does indicate the kind of problem we face with a good many more than 100,000 steel workers out of work. 
     In answer to your question specifically, we will come back to what further steps could be taken in April, but I do hope that the Congress will act on the proposals we have now made, which involve most especially the unemployment compensation payments and also the distressed area payments, as well as some improvements in social security. If we could move ahead on those we could get a better idea of perhaps what action should be taken in April. 
     [ 26.] Q. Mr. President, the fighting in Laos is continuing. The Soviet airlift is now 2 months old. The Soviet answer to the proposal to revive the International Control Commission has been delayed for some weeks. I wonder if you can tell us how long this Government is prepared to wait before it proposes some new action to resolve this continuing crisis. 
     THE PRESIDENT. There will be a meeting at the White House this afternoon on the subject of Laos and what new action we should now take. And I am hopeful that some proposal will be forthcoming from that meeting. 
     [ 27.] Q. Mr. President, many States are now re-forming their congressional districts as a result of the 1960 census and inevitably this leads to charges of gerrymandering directed at both parties. Can you tell us where you stand on Chairman Celler's bill to control gerrymandering to a certain extent by such devices as making districts be contiguous and control a certain population within a State? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, even if you could pass those proposals you could still have a good deal of gerrymandering. I represented a district which was about 5 to 1 Democratic, which was contiguous, which was geographically associated with an adjoining district, which was marginally Republican. Now it is very difficult for the Congress or for the Federal Government to enforce standards. What should have happened, of course, is probably under some standards is those two districts cut in a different way which would have provided instead of one Republican Congressman with a very marginal majority, while the Democratic Congressman got 5 to 1, it probably would have ended up with two Democratic Congressmen, which may or may not have been in the public interest. [Laughter.] 
     But I do think it is very difficult for us to try to draw these lines. There isn't any doubt that they are unsatisfactorily drawn, not only for the Congress, which is not the worst offender, but the State legislatures, where we have very - and have had for many years - notorious examples of gerrymandering, but which is a responsibility for the States, not the Federal Government. 
     In any case, I am not familiar wholly with Congressman Celler's proposal and exactly what his standards will be, but I will look at it. 
     Q. Mr. President, in that same connection, could you tell us where you stand or do you have a position on increasing the size of the House of Representatives? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, it is 435 Members now, which is a large body. Congressman Chelf and I believe other Congressmen have proposed increasing it, I think to 450. I will discuss that matter with Speaker Rayburn and get his views as well as the leadership of the House on both sides. 
     Reporter: Thank you, Mr. President.

 

NOTE: President Kennedy's third news conference was held in the State Department Auditorium at 10 o'clock on Wednesday morning, February 8, 1961. 
  
 


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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

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#26 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:06 PM

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26.

 

Remarks at the Dedication Breakfast of International Christian Leadership, Inc. 

February 9, 1961

 

Mr. Chairman, Dr. Graham, Mr. Vice President - gentlemen: 
     I think it is most appropriate that we should be gathered together for this morning's meeting. This country was founded by men and women who were dedicated or came to be dedicated to two propositions: first, a strong religious conviction, and secondly a recognition that this conviction could flourish only under a system of freedom. 
     I think it is appropriate that we pay tribute to this great constitutional principle which is enshrined in the First Amendment of the Constitution: the principle of religious independence, of religious liberty, of religious freedom. But I think it is also important that we pay tribute and acknowledge another great principle, and that is the principle of religious conviction. Religious freedom has no significance unless it is accompanied by conviction. And therefore the Puritans and the Pilgrims of my own section of New England, the Quakers of Pennsylvania, the Catholics of Maryland, the Presbyterians of North Carolina, the Methodists and the Baptists who came later, all shared these two great traditions which, like silver threads, have run through the warp and the woof of American history. 
     No man who enters upon the office to which I have succeeded can fail to recognize how every President of the United States has placed special reliance upon his faith in God. Every President has taken comfort and courage when told, as we are told today, that the Lord "will be with thee. He will not fail thee nor forsake thee. Fear not - neither be thou dismayed." 
     While they came from a wide variety of religious backgrounds and held a wide variety of religious beliefs, each of our Presidents in his own way has placed a special trust in God. Those who were strongest intellectually were also strongest spiritually. 
     Today our Nation is passing through another time of trial. In many ways, our dangers and our problems are far greater - and certainly infinitely more complex. We will need to draw upon the best that this Nation has - often - and draw upon it physically and intellectually and materially. 
     But we need also to call upon our great reservoir of spiritual resources. We must recognize that human collaboration is not enough, that in times such as these we must reach beyond ourselves if we are to seek ultimate courage and infinite wisdom. 
     It is an ironic fact that in this nuclear age, when the horizon of human knowledge and human experience has passed far beyond any that any age has ever known, that we turn back at this time to the oldest source of wisdom and strength, to the words of the prophets and the saints, who tell us that faith is more powerful than doubt, that hope is more potent than despair, and that only through 'the love that is sometimes called charity can we conquer those forces within ourselves and throughout all the world that threaten the very existence of mankind. 
     Keeping in mind that "when a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him," let us go forth to lead this land that we love, joining in the prayer of General George Washington in 1783, "that God would have you in His holy protection, that He would incline the hearts of the citizens . . . . to entertain a brotherly love and affection one for another . . . and finally that He would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with . . . the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, without an humble imitation of whose example we can never hope to be a happy nation." 
     The guiding principle and prayer of this Nation has been, is now, and shall ever be "In God We Trust." 
     Thank you.

[The President spoke first to the gentlemen in the hotel's main ball room, and then to the ladies in the east room.]

Madam Chairwoman, Dr. Graham, Mr. Vice President: 
     It seems to me that in the true Christian spirit next year we should all sit down together, and that we should have gentlemen and ladies pray and reason together, and not confine them in different rooms. 
     But we are glad we came here - the Vice President and I came under the protection of Dr. Graham. 
     I do want to say that it is a pleasure to be here and to have participated in the breakfast this morning. I had an opportunity in the White House the other day to talk to a group of men and women from the Baptist World Alliance who have been missionaries, some in the Congo, one lady who has been in Bengal, India, since 1926, others who have been in Thailand and Korea. 
     I do not regard religion as a weapon in the cold war. I regard it as the essence of the differences which separate those on the other side of the Iron Curtain and ourselves. 
     The whole basis of the struggle is involved in the meeting this morning: our strong belief in religious freedom, our strong conviction, as I attempted to say in my inaugural, that the blessings which come to us come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God - and this alternate concept that the state is the master and the people the servants. 
     This is really the essence of the issue. We cannot have religious freedom without political freedom, and therefore what we really need is not to confuse a system of freedom with one of disinterest, uninterest, cynicism, materialism, but like the ladies and gentlemen whom I talked to the other day, who have been willing to spend their lives under the most difficult of circumstances, in great hardship, in order to carry the message in which they have such great conviction, it seems to me it shows a lesson for us all. 
     We must match that faith. We must demonstrate in our lives, whatever our responsibility may be, that we care deeply. 
     I see no reason why the servants of the Communist system should be marked by a discipline and strong conviction in the ultimate success of their cause. I believe that our cause is just, that ultimately it will be successful. But it can only be successful if we demonstrate our strong conviction in it. 
     Religious freedom and religious conviction are the two hallmarks of American society, and therefore as a strong believer in both, I wanted to say that I deem it an honor to share this evidence of our common belief in these two great principles at this breakfast this morning. What we do this morning, I hope we can do every day. 
     Thank you.

NOTE: The ninth annual prayer breakfast sponsored by the International Christian Leadership, Inc., a nondenominational group of laymen, was held at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington. William C. Jones of Los Angeles, Calif., a leader in the group, served as host. Frank Carlson, U.S. Senator from Kansas, and Mrs. Olin D. Johnston, wife of U.S. Senator Johnston of South Carolina, acted as chairmen. The evangelist, Dr. Billy Graham, led in prayer. 
 


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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#27 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:06 PM

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27.

 

Special Message to the Congress on Health and Hospital Care. 

February 9, 1961

 

To the Congress of the United States: 
     The health of our nation is a key to its future - to its economic vitality, to the morale and efficiency of its citizens, to our success in achieving our own goals and demonstrating to others the benefits of a free society. 
     Ill health and its harsh consequences are not confined to any state or region, to any race, age, or sex or to any occupation or economic level. This is a matter of national concern. 
     More than twenty-five billion dollars a year - over 6 percent of our national income - is being spent from public and private funds for health services. Yet there are major deficiencies in the quality and distribution of these services. 
     The dramatic results of new medicines and new methods - opening the way to a fuller and more useful life - are too often beyond the reach of those who need them most. 
     Financial inability, absence of community resources, and shortages of trained personnel keep too many people from getting what medical knowledge can obtain for them. 
     Those among us who are over 65 - 16 million today in the United States - go to the hospital more often and stay longer than their younger neighbors. Their physical activity is limited by six times as much disability as the rest of the population. Their annual medical bill is twice that of persons under 65 - but their annual income is only half as high. 
     The nation's children - now 40 percent of our population - have urgent needs which must be met. Many still die in infancy. Many are not immunized against diseases which can be prevented, have inadequate diets or unnecessarily endure physical and emotional problems. 
     These and other problems of health care can and must be met. Only a part of the responsibility rests with the federal government. But its powers and resources make its role essential in four areas for improving health care: social insurance, facilities, personnel and research.

I. HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED

     Twenty-six years ago this nation adopted the principle that every member of the labor force and his family should be insured against the haunting fear of loss of income caused by retirement, death or unemployment. To that we have added insurance against the economic loss caused by disability. But there remains a significant gap that denies to all but those with the highest incomes a full measure of security - the high cost of ill health in old age. One out of five aged couples drawing Social Security benefits must go to the hospital each year. Half of those going to hospitals incur bills in excess of $700 a year. This is over one-third of the total annual income of atypical couple, more than a modest food budget for an entire year. Many simply do not obtain and cannot afford the care they need. 
     The measure adopted by the Congress last year recognized the problem of those needy aged requiring welfare assistance to meet their medical costs. But now we must meet the needs of those millions who have no wish to receive care at the taxpayers' expense, but who are nevertheless staggered by the drain on their savings - or those of their children - caused by an extended hospital stay. 
     In our Social Security and Railroad Retirement systems we have the instruments which can spread the cost of health services in old age over the working years - effectively, and in a manner consistent with the dignity of the individual. By using these proved systems to provide health insurance protection, it will be possible for our older people to get the vital hospital services they need without exhausting their resources or turning to public assistance. The self-supporting insurance method of financing the cost of such health services is certainly to be preferred to an expansion of public assistance, and should reduce the number of those needing medical care under the public assistance program. The State and local money thus freed should be further used to help provide services not included in this proposal, and to assist those not covered. 
     For it should be stressed that this is a very modest proposal cut to meet absolutely essential needs, and with sufficient "deductible" requirements to discourage any malingering or unnecessary overcrowding of our hospitals. 
     In essence, I am recommending enactment of a health insurance program under the Social Security system that will provide the following benefits: 
     First, inpatient hospital services up to 90 days in a single spell of illness, for all costs in excess of $10 per day for the first 9 days (with a minimum of $20), and full costs for the remaining 81 days. Because hospital costs place by far the heaviest and most unmanageable burden on older persons, it is these services that should receive major emphasis in any health insurance program. 
     Second, skilled nursing home services up to 180 days immediately after discharge from a hospital. To provide an incentive for use of these less expensive facilities, an individual could, in short, receive two days of skilled nursing home care in place of one day of hospital care when this satisfies his requirements. 
     Third, hospital outpatient clinic diagnostic services for all costs in excess of $20. These services, too, will reduce the need for hospital admissions and encourage early diagnosis. 
     Fourth, community visiting nurse services, and related home health services, for a limited period of time. These will enable many older people to receive proper health care in their own homes. 
     I propose that these insurance benefits be available to all persons aged 65 and over who are eligible for social security or railroad retirement benefits. 
     This program would be financed by an increase in social security contributions of one-quarter of one percent each on employers and employees, and by an increase in the maximum earnings base from $4800 a year to $5000 which would amply cover the cost of all insurance benefits provided. The system would be self-supporting and would not place any burden on the general revenues. 
     This program is not a program of socialized medicine. It is a program of prepayment of health costs with absolute freedom of choice guaranteed. Every person will choose his own doctor and hospital. 
     No service performed by any physician at either home or office, and no fee he charges for such services, would be involved, covered or affected in any way. There would be no supervision or control over the practice of medicine by any doctor or over the manner in which medical services are provided by any hospital. The program is a sound one and entirely in accordance with the traditional American system of placing responsibility on the employee and the employer, rather than on the general taxpayers, to help finance retirement and health costs.

II. COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES AND FACILITIES

     The ability to afford adequate health care is to no avail without adequate health facilities. The financial support which will be available under the health insurance program I am recommending will, in itself, stimulate more facilities and services. But our communities need additional help to provide those services where everybody can use them.

A. Nursing Home Construction Grants.

     There is now a shortage of 500,000 beds in long-term facilities for people who are sick but who do not require the special services of a general hospital. We must move with greater speed in the construction of more skilled nursing homes; particularly if our new program is to encourage recuperation, if impossible at home, in this kind of facility instead of in our overcrowded hospitals. I am submitting to Congress legislation to double the present authorization of $10 million in matching grants for this construction program.

B. Grants To Improve Nursing-Home and Home-Nursing Services.

     Increasing the number of nursing home beds will not alone remedy the deficiency in care. Good operation, good service, and proper safety are essential. Nor do all the aged sick and chronically ill need to be cared for in hospitals or nursing homes. At some stages in their illness many people can fare better in their own homes if proper care is available. But most communities do not have home health services. Even limited home nursing services are available in less than 1,000 U.S. communities. 
     I am therefore proposing stimulatory grants to the states, and through them to communities, to improve the quality of services in nursing homes - to develop organized community home-care health services for the aged and chronically ill - to develop health service information and referral centers - to train additional personnel required for out-of-hospital health services - and to assist in meeting the cost of studies and demonstrations of new and improved means of providing out-of-hospital care. An initial annual appropriation of ten million dollars will lay the groundwork for more efficient and better balanced care for the aged and chronically ill. 
     To insure maximum Federal attention to the rapid development of this program, I propose that the Congress enact legislation enabling the Public Health Service to create a new Bureau of Community Health to provide the necessary leadership and assistance to states and communities.

C. Hospital Research and Development.

     Hospitals account for more than 6 billion dollars a year of the nation's gross expenditures. In this modern age, an enterprise of such size and importance requires continuous and substantial research and development as a basis for operations. Specifically, we need more intensive regional and area planning to attain the maximum economical use from these costly structures; and we need more research into how hospital facilities can be built, and how services within hospitals should be organized and administered, in order to provide the best possible medical care with the personnel available. I am therefore recommending that, in place of an arbitrary appropriations ceiling for research in this area, the Congress have the authority to determine each year the amount necessary for these purposes; and that the Surgeon General be authorized to make project grants for the construction of experimental or demonstration hospitals and other medical facilities.

III. INCREASING HEALTH PERSONNEL

     Adequate health care requires an adequate supply of well-trained personnel. We do not have that adequate supply today - and shortages are growing. 
     We must increase sharply the rate of doctor and dentist training merely to keep pace with our growing population - and we need far more if, as part of our international responsibilities, we are to help meet critical medical needs in key areas of the world. But we not only fall short of our goal to help those nations by exporting sufficient numbers of doctors to provide the nucleus for a world health program, we are actually the beneficiaries of more than a thousand physicians a year who come from foreign lands to practice in the United States. 
     We have now 92 medical and 47 dental schools. These graduate only 7,500 physicians and 3,200 dentists each year. If during the next ten years the capacity of our medical schools is increased 50 percent, and that of our dental schools by 100 percent, the output will still be sufficient only to maintain the present ratio of physicians and dentists to population. 
     To do this we must have within the next 10 years substantial increases in enrollment in existing schools, plus 20 new medical schools and 20 new dental schools. 
     But the great deterrent to the establishment and expansion of these schools is lack of funds. Modern medical and dental schools are extraordinarily expensive to build and operate. Teaching hospitals cost even more. A university which establishes a medical and dental school must do so with the expectation of a substantial drain on its financial resources, and most institutions are not able to find such funds. 
     Moreover, the average cost to the student of four years of medical school is over $10,000 - a heavy burden to come on top of the cost of a four-year undergraduate education. Furthermore, once the student obtains his medical degree, he must still look forward to an average of 3 years of hospital experience, at little or no pay, before he can begin his life's work. It is not surprising that 40 percent of all medical students now come from the 12 percent of the families with incomes of $10,000 or more a year. Nor is it surprising, though disturbing, that while college enrollments generally have been soaring, the number of applicants to medical and dental schools has been dropping; and that many of these schools are having difficulty in securing enough qualified students who are able to afford such an education. 
     The federal government has made substantial contributions through fellowships and training aid for graduate students in the physical and biological sciences, and for research training in health fields. The result has been a rapidly increasing number of recruits to these fields. 
     In contrast there has been very little financial assistance of any kind available to medical and dental students. Only one medical student in 10 receives a scholarship from any source, and these average only $500 a year (compared to an average cost of over $2500). In dentistry even less scholarship aid is available. 
     Decisive federal action is necessary to stimulate and assist in the establishment and expansion of medical and dental schools, and to help more talented but needy students to enter the health professions while bolstering the quality of their training. 
     I have four recommendations to be combined in a single measure: 
     ( a ) I propose an immediate program of planning grants to help our academic institutions plan new facilities for medical and dental schools and to explore ways of improving the whole educational process; 
     ( b ) I recommend a ten-year program of matching grants to assist in the construction, expansion, and restoration of medical and dental schools to increase their capacity. This program should make available $25 million in the first year, and $75 million annually thereafter; 
     ( c ) I recommend a program of federal scholarships for talented medical and dental students in need of financial assistance. Federal funds would be available for each institution in a total amount equal to $1500 for one-fourth of the newly entering students, to be awarded in individual four-year scholarships by the institution in proportion to the student's need, with no student being eligible for more than $2000 a year. 
     ( d ) Finally, I recommend that the schools receive a cost of education grant of $1000 for each federal scholarship, to make certain that this program does not work further financial injury upon our medical and dental schools whose costs per pupil are never met by his tuition and fees. In addition to assisting our schools now operating, this feature would also give some encouragement to 'institutions now doubtful about the burden of establishing new medical and dental schools. 
     For nursing, I must add, the need and shortage are also great; but the problems are different and more complex. We intend to develop for nursing, as we have for medicine and dentistry, a formulation of needs and training requirements; and appropriate proposals will be submitted to the Congress when completed.

IV. IMPROVING THE HEALTH OF OUR CHILDREN AND YOUTH

     While meeting the health needs of the older groups in our population, we cannot neglect the needs of the young. One-fifth of our children under five have not been immunized against poliomyelitis. Since 1950, our country has slipped from 6th to 10th place among the advanced nations of the world in the saving of infant lives. Each year some 400,000 babies are born with congenital malformations - and untold numbers of others begin life mentally retarded, afflicted by cerebral palsy or suffering from other serious conditions which require prompt and effective care and additional research. 
     A. I am recommending that there be established in the National Institutes of Health a new National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which will include a Center for Research in Child Health as well as other broad-ranging health research activities not now covered by the specialized work of the existing institutes. 
     B. I am recommending to the Congress an increase in appropriations for the existing Maternal and Child Health, Crippled Children and Child Welfare programs of the Children's Bureau. By this means, the fruits of our research can move at a faster pace to those who need them most. 
     C. In order to provide more unified administration and increased effectiveness of federal efforts for physical fitness, I am designating the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare as the Chairman of the President's Council on Youth Fitness. I am asking him to mobilize the full resources of his Department and other interested agencies toward encouraging public and private agencies and individuals to improve the physical fitness of our nation's youth; and I am further asking him to report at an early date on the adequacy of existing school health programs and what changes, if any, are needed in the Federal Government's role in the stimulation of such programs.

V. VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

     This administration intends to see that the rehabilitation of disabled Americans and their return to active and useful lives is expanded as rapidly as possible. Our Federal-State program of vocational rehabilitation and the cooperating voluntary agencies must be assisted in providing more nearly adequate facilities and services to reach the thousands of persons who become disabled every year. We need their talents and skills if our economy is to reach a high level of performance. To this end I shall recommend to the Congress an increase in federal matching funds to expand the vocational rehabilitation program.

VI. MEDICAL RESEARCH

     The next ten years will require a vast expansion of this nation's present total effort in medical research, if knowledge is to keep pace with human progress. I recommend: 
     A. Extension and expansion of the present program authorizing matching grants for the construction of research facilities. 
     B. Removal of the current limitation on the federal payment of indirect costs of medical research projects, which has handicapped many universities and other research institutions. 
     C. An increase in the funds for medical research requested in the Budget previously submitted.

CONCLUSION

     The measures I have recommended recognize and strengthen the indispensable elements in a sound health program - people, knowledge, services, facilities, and the means to pay for them. Taken together, they constitute a necessary foundation upon which to build. 
     The health of the American people must ever be safeguarded; it must ever be improved. As long as people are stricken by a disease which we have the ability to prevent, as long as people are chained by a disability which can be reversed, as long as needless death takes its toll, then American health will be unfinished business. 
     It is to the unfinished business in health - which affects every person and home and community in this land - that we must now direct our best efforts.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#28 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:08 PM

--

 

28.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House 

Proposing Creation of Additional Federal Judgeships. 
February 10, 1961

[Released February 10, 1961. Dated February 9, 1961]

Dear Mr.---------- 
     I have requested the Attorney General to submit to the Congress legislation to create fifty-nine additional Federal judgeships to relieve serious congestion and delays in many Federal Courts. Fifty will be in the District Courts and nine in the Court of Appeals. 
     Extensive Congressional hearings have been conducted in both the Senate and the House in recent Congresses and testimony received from representatives of the American Bar Association, State and local associations, the judicial Conference of the United States and others interested in and affected by the operations of our courts, showing very clearly that the administration of justice in the Federal Court system is unduly delayed. Despite the tremendous increase of court congestion and judicial lag, no new Federal judgeships have been created since February 10, 1954. 
     I have asked the Attorney General separately to describe to you the essential details of this essential legislation. Prompt and favorable consideration of the measure will be of direct benefit to millions of people throughout the country. 
     Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
     For the President's statement upon signing the Omnibus Judgeship Bill, see Item 195. 
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#29 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:10 PM

--

 

29.

 

Statement by the President Upon Announcing the Appointment of Consultants 
on Government Organization and Operations. 
February 10, 1961


 

 

     I AM PLEASED to announce the names of four men who have agreed to serve as consultants on major issues affecting the structure and operations of government. The men are: 
     Robert A. Lovett, of New York, former Secretary of Defense and Under Secretary of State. 
     Richard E. Neustadt of New York, Professor of Government at Columbia University, who served between last fall's election and the Inauguration as my special consultant on organizational matters. 
     Don K. Price of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Dean of the Graduate School of Public Administration at Harvard University. 
     Sydney Stein, Jr., of Chicago, a partner in Stein, Roe, and Farnham, investment counsellors, formerly associated with the Bureau of the Budget in the field of government organization and management. 
     They will be consulted in matters where the disinterested advice of highly qualified and experienced men in private life may help us find effective solutions to problems of government organization and operation. They will not act as a committee nor will they hold regular meetings. Instead, they will be asked for advice as individuals, under flexible and informal arrangements suited to the needs of the problem at hand. Their regular point of contact will be the Budget Director, who will keep them informed of significant developments and emerging issues. 
     It is my conviction that the structure and operations of government must be continually adapted to constant changes in the requirements for governmental action and the methods of meeting those requirements. The consultants named today are exceptionally well equipped to help us conceive and carry through the necessary adaptations in timely and orderly fashion. I am grateful for their willingness to serve in this important capacity. 
     In view of these simpler and more flexible arrangements, the Advisory Committee on Government Organization, created in 1953, will no longer be necessary. Accordingly, I am terminating that Committee by Executive Order. 
     I am also terminating the Advisory Committee on Management Improvement, which was established in 1949 but has not functioned since 1952.

 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#30 Greg Burnham

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 12:11 PM

--

 

30.

 

Statement by the President Upon Announcing the Appointment of Aubrey J. Wagner 

as a Member of the Board of Directors, Tennessee Valley Authority. 
February 11, 1961


 

     I REGARD Mr. Wagner's appointment as a recognition not only of his own career and capacities but of the loyalty and dedication that has uniquely characterized the staff of the Tennessee Valley Authority over the full period of its development. The ranks of the agency can boast other men and women who like Mr. Wagner have torn loose from their own geographical roots to devote careers to this region that had become an eddy in the mainstream of progress. 
     The TVA has done a remarkable job but the job is not done. It has demonstrated in 27 years that it has the imagination and flexibility to grow with its times but it must prove in its second quarter century that it can remain vigorous as it grows old. The TVA, like every vital branch of the government, must never allow itself to relapse into an attitude of entrenched bureaucracy. 
     I want to be sure also that we lose no opportunity to share the great experience of the TVA with other nations faced with the gap between resources and resource development. I want the agency to study ways in which the lessons it has learned in the Tennessee Valley may be exported abroad and applied to our great objective of human enhancement. 
     Toward these ends I would like a report from the TVA Board by April 15 so that I may know the directions in which the agency proposes to work in the years immediately ahead.

 

NOTE: A report entitled "TVA Directions - Past and Future" (20 pp., mimeographed) was submitted to the President on April 26, 1961. 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

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#31 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:21 AM

--

 

31.

 

Remarks at the Swearing In of Robert C. Weaver as Housing and Home Finance Administrator. 

February 11, 1961

 

     IT IS a great pleasure to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Weaver to the White House, and also it is a great pleasure for me to participate in Mr. Weaver's swearing-in. 


     The responsibility which he is assuming is one of the most important in the country. Under Mr. Weaver's leadership, it is our hope that housing, shelter, for all Americans can be substantially improved. 


     Public housing, urban renewal, private housing, all of this represents a basic aspiration of American families to house themselves securely. There are, according to our latest Census Bureau figures, over 25 million Americans who live in substandard housing. It is the ambition of this administration to try to provide decent housing for all American families, and Mr. Weaver's responsibility will be to lead this important national effort. 


     So I am delighted to have them here. I have the highest confidence in his ability, his energy, his integrity, his loyalty; and I am confident that he will serve as a force in this important field for a better life for all Americans. 


     So we are glad to see you, Mr. Weaver, and to present you with this certificate. 
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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#32 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:23 AM

--

 

32.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House 

Transmitting Bill To Provide Health Insurance for the Aged. February 13, 1961



 

Dear Mr.-------------- 
     I am transmitting herewith a bill to provide health insurance benefits for the aged, financed through the social insurance system. I believe the need for such insurance is urgent. Every study has demonstrated that the costs of adequate health care for those over 65 are becoming an accelerated problem. 
     Enactment of the legislation would not relieve its beneficiaries of their entire responsibility for the costs incurred by them for their medical needs, but it would enable them to meet most of their medical care costs without any humiliating means test. The financing is based upon the sound and proven social security principles. 
     The enclosed letter from the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare describes the proposed legislation in more detail. 
         Sincerely,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
     Secretary Ribicoff's letter of February 10 was released with the President's letter. A summary of the provisions of the draft bill is published in the Congressional Record (vol. 107, Feb. 13, 1961, p. 2014). 
  
  
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

AssassinationOfJFK.net Main Page

 

Forum:

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#33 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:24 AM

--

 

33.

 

Address at a Luncheon Meeting of the National Industrial 

 Conference Board. February 13, 1961

 

Mr. White, Dean Sayre, distinguished guests - gentlemen: 
     I want, first of all, to express my personal thanks to all of you for having come to our city, and for participating in what I hope will be a most useful and helpful proceeding which will benefit this Government and our country. 
     It has recently been suggested that whether I serve one or two terms in the Presidency, I will find myself at the end of that period at what might be called the awkward age-too old to begin a new career and too young to write my memoirs. 
     A similar dilemma, it seems to me, is posed by the occasion of a Presidential address to a business group on business conditions less than four weeks after entering the White House - for it is too early to be claiming credit for the new administration and too late to be blaming the old one. And it would be premature to seek your support in the next election, and inaccurate to express thanks for having had it in the last one. 
     I feel, nevertheless, that I can claim kinship here, and have that claim allowed. For I am convinced that the real spirit of American business is not represented by those involved in price-fixing, conflict-of-interest, or collusion. The real spirit is in this room - in your recognition of your public responsibilities, your pursuit of the truth, your desire for better industrial relations, better technological progress, and better price stability and economic growth. And because your organization portrays that picture of American business, I am delighted and proud to be here with you. 
     The complaint has often been made in business circles that the Federal Government is a "silent partner" in every corporation - taking roughly half of all of your net earnings without risk to itself. But it should be also realized that this makes business a not always "silent partner" of the Federal Government - that our revenues and thus our success are dependent upon your profits and your success - and that, far from being natural enemies, Government and business are necessary allies. 
     For example, the 1960 drop in expected corporate profits of some six to seven billion dollars also caused a loss in Federal revenues of over three billion dollars - enough to pay the Federal share of all of our anti-recession, health, and education proposals for the next fiscal year and still have enough left over to start closing what the Democrats in this administration used to call "The Missile Gap." 
     An equally critical gap separates the tax revenues of a lagging economy from those which are potentially within our grasp: a gap of at least twelve billion dollars. Even after we are able to launch every program necessary for national security and development, this amount of revenue would still leave a substantial surplus - a surplus essential to help defend our economy against inflation - and, equally important, a surplus that, when applied to the Federal debt, would free additional savings for business investment and expansion. 
     In short, there is no inevitable clash between the public and the private sectors - or between investment and consumption - nor, as I have said, between Government and business. All elements in our national economic growth are interdependent. Each must play its proper role - and that is the hope and the aim of this administration. 
     If those of you who are in the world of business, and we who are in the world of government, are necessarily partners, what kind of a partnership is this going to be? Will it be marked by mutual suspicion and recrimination, or by mutual understanding and fruitful collaboration? 
     On behalf of my associates in the Cabinet, I want to be very precise: we will not discriminate for or against any segment of our society, or any segment of the business community. We are vigorously opposed to corruption and monopoly and human exploitation - but we are not opposed to business. 
     We know that your success and ours are intertwined - that you have facts and knowhow that we need. Whatever past differences may have existed, we seek more than an attitude of truce, more than a treaty - we seek the spirit of a full-fledged alliance. 
     Today, I would briefly mention three areas of common concern to which that alliance must be devoted in the next few years: economic growth, plant modernization, and price stability.

I.

     First: Economic growth has come to resemble the Washington weather - everyone talks about it, no one says precisely what to do about it, and our only satisfaction is that it can't get any worse. 
     The economic program which I have set before the Congress is essentially a program for recovery - and I do not equate recovery with growth. But it is an essential first step. Only by putting millions of people back to work can we expand purchasing power and markets. Only by higher income and profits can we provide the incentive and the means for increased investment. And only when we are using our plant at near capacity can we expect any solid expansion. 
     Capacity operation is the key. No matter what other arguments or stimulants are used, the incentives for investing new capital to expand manufacturing plants and equipment are weak as long as manufacturers are operating at less than 80 percent of their capacity. From 1950 to 1958, we put only one-sixth of our total output into capital formation, while Japan, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Canada, and Sweden were all investing one-fifth or more of their total output in capital goods. So it is not surprising that each of these and other nations over the past several years have all surpassed us in average annual rate of economic growth. 
     I think we can do better. Working together, business and Government must do better - putting people back to work, using plants to capacity, and spurring savings and investments with at least a large part of our economic gains - beginning not when our economy is back at the top, but beginning now.

II.

     Secondly: New plant investment not only means expansion of capacity - it means modernization as well. Gleaming new factories and headlines about automation have diverted our attention from an aging industrial plant. Obsolescence is slowing down our growth, handicapping our productivity, and worsening our competitive position abroad. 
     Nothing can reverse our balance of payments deficit if American machinery and equipment cannot produce the newest products of the highest quality in the most efficient manner. The available evidence on the age of our industrial plant is unofficial and fragmentary; but the trend is unmistakable - we are falling behind. 
     The average age of equipment in American factories today is about 9 years. In a dynamic economy, that average should be falling, as new equipment is put into place. Instead the available evidence suggests that it has been slowly rising. 
     Private surveys of machine tools used by manufacturers of general industrial equipment found less than half of these tools over 10 years old in 1949, but 2/3 over that age in 1958. Nineteen percent of our machine tools were found to be over 20 years old. 
     Meanwhile, other countries have been lowering the average age of their fixed capital. The German example is the most spectacular - their proportion of capital equipment and plant under 5 years of age grew from one-sixth of the total in 1948 to two-fifths in 1957. 
     All of these facts point in one direction: we must start now to provide additional stimulus to the modernization of American industrial plants. Within the next few weeks, I shall propose to the Congress a new tax incentive for businesses to expand their normal investment in plant and equipment. 
     But modernization and productivity depend upon more than investment in physical resources. Equally essential is investment in human resources. And I think that this is obvious to those of us who have considered the problems of unemployment and depressed areas. There is no doubt that the maximum impact of a reducing economy falls upon those who are at the bottom of the educational ladder. The first people unemployed are those with the least education, the last people to be hired back are those with the least education. So there is a direct connection between increased emphasis on education in this country and also upon increased productivity and technological change. 
     Without strengthened programs for health, education, and science and research, the new modern plant would only be a hollow shell. Many of these programs are within the province of State and local governments. Full recovery will increase the tax revenues that they so sorely need. But the Federal Government will have to pay its fair share of developing these human resources.

III.

     Finally, Government and business must turn their attention to the problem of price stability. Concern over the resumption of inflationary pressures hangs over all our efforts to restore the economy, to stimulate its growth, and to maintain our competitive status abroad. In recent days, complaints have been voiced in some quarters that this administration was not meeting its responsibilities in this area. But the facts are that, whatever one may regard our responsibilities to be, we are almost totally without direct and enforceable powers over the central problem. A free government in a free society has only a limited influence - provided that they are above the minimum - over prices and wages freely set and bargained for by free individuals and free enterprises. And this is as it should be if our economy is to remain free. 
     Nevertheless, the public interest in major wage and price determinations is substantial. Ways must be found to bring that public interest before the parties concerned in a fair and orderly manner. 
     For this reason, I have announced my determination to establish a Presidential Advisory Committee on Labor-Management Policy, with members drawn from labor, management and the public. I want this Committee to play a major role in helping promote sound wage and price policies, productivity increases, and a betterment of America's competitive position in world markets. I will look to this Committee to make an important contribution to labor-management relations, and to a wider understanding of their impact on price stability and our economic health. And in this undertaking, I ask and urge the constructive cooperation of this organization and its members.

 


     Economic growth, plant modernization, price stability - these are all intangible and elusive goals. But they are all essential to your success, and to the success of our country. Initiative, innovation, hard work, and cooperation will be required, on your part, and on ours. 
     But I have confidence in our Nation, confidence in our economy, and confidence in your ability to meet your obligations fully. I hope that my associates and I can merit your confidence as well. For I can assure you that we love our country, not for what it was, though it has always been great - not for what it is, though of this we are deeply proud - but for what it some day can and, through the efforts of us all, some day will be. 
     Thank you. 


NOTE: The President spoke at 1:50 p.m. at the Sheraton-Park Hotel in Washington. His opening words "Mr. White, Dean Sayre" referred to Charles M. White, chairman of the National Industrial Conference Board, and the Very Reverend Francis B. Sayre, Jr., Dean of the Washington Cathedral. 
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#34 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:25 AM

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34.

 

Message to the Permanent Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

February 15, 1961

 

     IN MY Inaugural Address I pledged to the members of this great organization "the loyalty of faithful friends." 
     In the three weeks since I became President I have been increasingly impressed by the magnitude of the perils which confront the United States and free nations everywhere. But I have also been increasingly convinced that we can face down those perils, if we mobilize the unified strength and will of the nations of the Atlantic Community. . 
     We of the Atlantic Community are the single most effective obstacle between tyranny and its desire to dominate the world. Our historic bonds of friendship have been strengthened by common values and a common goal - the creation of a world where free men can live at peace and in dignity, liberated from the bonds of hunger, poverty and ignorance. If we act together, this goal is within our grasp. If we falter, then freedom itself will be in mortal danger. 
     Therefore I pledge the United States, and my own unremitting efforts, to the support of the principles which guide our effort, to the basic concept of unity which gives us strength, and to the institutions we have created to give working life to our common intent. 
     Effective collective defense is the first mission of our great alliance in NATO. Our task here is to convince any aggressor that an attack on the territory of NATO members would be met with swift and punishing resistance. While relying also on the growing strength of all, the United States will continue its full participation in the common defense effort. I am convinced that the maintenance of U.S. military strength in Europe is essential to the security of the Atlantic Community and the free world as a whole. Strength in Europe, like strength here in the United States, is an essential condition of peace. 
     But the interests of NATO, and the Atlantic Community as a whole, are not military alone. The dangers to our security and the challenges to our enterprise take many forms - economic, ideological and political. Through its various instruments the Atlantic Community must equip itself to respond with speed and unity of purpose on every front - by improving our processes of consultation - by expanding the area of our cooperation to include common problems of trade and money, and by uniting in the effort to construct a sound, growing economy for the entire non-Communist world. 
     This last undertaking - the task of economic development - is vital to the preservation of freedom in the turbulent, emerging continents of Asia, Africa and Latin America; it is also a duty which the strong owe to the weak. It is an undertaking unmatched in scope, in difficulty, and in nobility of purpose. 
     It is an important and heartening fact that the adventure of assisting the underdeveloped areas has captured the imagination and the idealism of the young on both sides of the Atlantic. This undertaking will require the efforts of all of us - and other nations too. In accomplishing all our economic tasks we must work together in a new intimacy in the OECD, and I hope that through the OECD we shall come firmly to grips with this fundamental problem of aid. 
     Although the technical task here is economic, our ultimate purpose transcends material considerations. The challenge is to create a new partnership between the old nations in the north and the new nations to the south. In the end, we must build that partnership not merely on a common interest in economic growth, but on a common commitment to the principles of political freedom. 
     The United States, because of its larger resources, is prepared to bear a heavy share of this burden. But I am confident that the nations of Western Europe will wish to commit an equitable proportion of their own growing resources to the common effort of economic development, as well as to the tasks of the common defense. Without that willingness our effort will surely fail. In all our common enterprises we must establish principles, clearly understood by our governments and our peoples, on which burden-sharing can be based. 
     We shall also continue to support and encourage the movement toward European integration. This movement is a powerful and unifying force which can multiply free Europe's strength and prestige, can assure increased security and progress for European peoples, and can contribute greatly to meeting the goals of the broader Atlantic Community. 
     The years ahead will be difficult and dangerous for the friends of freedom. There will be setbacks as well as gains. But if we face candidly the agenda that confronts us, our natural differences will fade and assume tolerable proportions. If we summon to the real tasks we face our resources of mind and will and material strength - if we never lose sight of our common goals - then we will have carried forward in our time the old task of our community: to preserve and extend the values of a civilization which has lighted man's way for more than 2500 years.

 

NOTE: The message to the Permanent Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Paris was read by Frederick W. Nolting, Deputy U.S. Representative to NATO.


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#35 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:26 AM

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35.

 

The President's News Conference of February 15, 1961


 

     THE PRESIDENT. I have several statements to make first, and then I will be glad to submit to questions. 
     [ 1.] Ambassador Stevenson in the Security Council today has expressed fully and clearly the attitude of the United States Government towards the attempts to undermine the effectiveness of the United Nations organization. The United States can take care of itself, but the United Nations system exists so that every nation can have the assurance of security. Any attempt to destroy this system is a blow aimed directly at the independence and security of every nation, large and small. 
     I am also, however, seriously concerned at what appears to be a threat of unilateral intervention in the internal affairs of the Republic of Congo. I find it difficult to believe that any government is really planning to take so dangerous and irresponsible a step. Nevertheless, I feel it important that there should be no misunderstanding of the position of the United States in such an eventuality. 
     The United States has supported and will continue to support the United Nations presence in the Congo. The United States considers that the only legal authority entitled to speak for the Congo as a whole is a government established under the Chief of State, President Kasavubu, who has been seated in the General Assembly of the United Nations by a majority vote of its members. The broadening of the government under President Kasavubu is a quite legitimate subject of discussion, and such discussions have been going on in Leopoldville and in New York. But the purported recognition of Congolese factions as so-called governments in other parts of that divided country can only confuse and make more difficult the task of securing Congolese independence and unity. 
     The United Nations offers the best, if not the only possibility for the restoration of conditions of stability and order in the Congo. 
     The press reports this afternoon that Prime Minister Nehru has stated, and I quote, "If the United Nations goes out of the Congo, it will be a disaster." I strongly agree with this view. Only by the presence of the United Nations in the Congo can peace be kept in Africa. 
     I would conceive it to be the duty of the United States and, indeed, all members of the United Nations to defend the Charter of the United Nations by opposing any attempt by any government to intervene unilaterally in the Congo. 
     [ 2.] Secondly, I have a statement that we have today recognized the Government of El Salvador. It has announced its determination to bring about free and democratic elections in that country, and it seeks solutions for the economic and social difficulties which that country has faced. These objectives are in consonance with our goal of a free and prosperous Latin America. Manifestos of the government and its agencies have indicated a clear determination to improve the standard of living of the people of that country, particularly those engaged in agriculture. We hope to be able to assist El Salvador in reaching these goals under the spirit of the act of Bogota. 
     [ 3.] Thirdly, this country is most concerned about the very serious problem of unemployment which we have faced this winter and the more than five and a half million Americans who want to work and can't find a job. 
     We are particularly concerned about the more than 600,000 Americans who have exhausted their unemployment compensation checks and who are now on relief. We have sent to the Congress a program which we believe would be of assistance to the country and to them this winter. We do, as you know, provide for an extension of unemployment compensation benefits for those who have exhausted their benefits. We provide aid to unemployed workers. Today under the law a child of a worker who is out of work can only receive necessary assistance if his family splits up. We would correct that situation. 
     We sent a program up for aid to distressed areas. 
     We have sent up legislation improving the minimum wage. 
     We have sent up legislation to the Hill which will provide for an increase in social security benefits, and it will be followed by other programs as time goes on. 
     We have also provided for Executive action increasing the amount of food available in those areas of the United States where people live on these food packages. 
     I hope that we can get action on these programs as soon as possible. Today the Ways and Means Committee of the House held hearings on our program to extend unemployment compensation benefits. I am hopeful that we can move forward this winter so that some relief can be given to our fellow Americans. 
     In order to provide a stimulus to our economy I have provided, with the cooperation of the departments of the Government, for a speedup in programs using funds now available. Over $250 million, as we have said, will be distributed immediately under the GI dividend program. There are $4 billion for tax refunds which are coming due. As soon as those who are available for these refunds can put their applications in, we will attempt to stimulate and improve and quicken distribution of these funds. 
     We provided under the instructions given through the State of the Union Address for $700 million, committed this month for additional Polaris submarines and airlift capacity. In addition, we are providing through the Post Office a speedup in the programs to build post offices which had been authorized and approved by the Congress previously; but these programs would be developed in a more concentrated period than they would otherwise have been. 
     For farmers we have provided $75 million additional for loans co speed spring planting costs and also for farm home loans. 
     For the Federal highway construction program we are going to make $734 million to be available to the States this month. This program of course calls for action by the States and the local bodies. And we are sending, tonight, telegrams to all the State Governors asking if they also can provide for speedup in their programs. 
     I want to make it clear that we are going to continue to work in cooperation with the Governors and with the Congress, all agencies of the Government, because we want to see the American economy get back on its feet. We want to see these people working again. 
     In addition, the Small Business Administration plans to increase by 25 percent the criteria for what small businesses there are that are eligible for defense contracts. By increasing this criteria we will make other small businesses eligible who happen to be in areas where there is high unemployment. 
     I am hopeful that these programs will all be of assistance. Mr. Goldberg's tour showed that in States like Michigan, nearly 350,000 people are out of work; 12 percent of the people in Gary, Ind. - over 200,000 steel workers; and they need our help. 
     I will be glad to answer any questions. 
     [ 4.] Q. Mr. President, regarding the situation in the Congo and the crisis precipitated there by the Soviet Union, could you evaluate the impact on Soviet-American relations and your hopes that they might be improving? 
     THE PRESIDENT. This statement was carefully drawn and represents the policy of the United States at this time on these matters, and I am going to confine myself, in all questions on the Congo, to the statement that we have made. I think this is the most effective way to deal with it. 
     Q. Mr. President, in a related field, however, Mr. Khrushchev this afternoon, I think in a message replying to you, said that he welcomed your proposal that you voiced in the State of the Union Message for pooling American-Soviet efforts in space exploration projects. Do you think this sort of pooling and cooperation you envisioned in your State of the Union Message will still be possible under the tense conditions that developed in the U.N. today? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I hope it will be possible for the relations between the United States and the Soviet Union to develop in such a way that the peace can be protected and that it will be possible for us to use our energies along peaceful and productive and fruitful lines. 
     The development of space, preventing outer space from being used as a new area of war, of course, is of the greatest possible concern to the people of this country. I am hopeful that it will be possible, if relations between our two countries can be maintained, can be channeled along peaceful lines; I am hopeful that real progress can be made this year. But it is my earnest hope that our relations can remain harmonious and that it will be possible for us to cooperate in peaceful ventures rather than be differing on matters which carry with them such hazards. 
     [ 5.] Q. Along this line, sir, could you tell us how you would feel about a meeting at some time in the next few weeks or months with Mr. Khrushchev? Do you think it would be helpful or if it should be delayed? 
     THE PRESIDENT. There are no plans nor have there been any plans for any meeting with Mr. Khrushchev. As I said earlier, I have not heard whether Mr. Khrushchev is planning to come to the United Nations meeting. There are no other plans for a meeting at this time. 
     Q. If he did come, Sir, would you welcome a visit of Mr. Khrushchev to Washington? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I would make a judgment as to what could usefully be done once we knew what Mr. Khrushchev's plans were and what - we would make a judgment as to what actions we would take. But I must say I have not heard that Mr. Khrushchev is planning to come to the United Nations at this time. 
     [ 6.] Q. Mr. President, you addressed a conference of businessmen here early this week and one of the officials of that conference noticed afterwards with some satisfaction that you hadn't used the word recession. He said he thought this was a good thing because in fact there was no business recession. Was your omission because you agreed with him or how do you feel about the word and about the economic situation? 
     THE PRESIDENT. As you know, if you are unemployed and out of a job you think there is a recession. If you are working, perhaps the impact of the economic slowdown doesn't hit you quite as hard. I think we have been in a recession for some months and that we have not recovered fully from the recession of '58, which is a matter, of course, of great concern. 
     We are concerned because while there was an economic slowdown in '49, and '54, and '58, we now have an economic slowdown only 2 years after the '58 recession. So this compounds our difficulties. I think that - well, to - to put it precisely to things, then I would call this a recession. 
     [ 7.] Q. In line, sir, with your statement a moment ago that you hoped that the relations between United States and Russia would improve, Adm. Arleigh Burke is quoted in some newspapers today in an interview in which he makes some rather sharp comments on American and Russian relations and among other things says that the United States Navy would sail into the Black Sea if it so chose. I am asking, sir, is this in line with your administration policy that all high officials should speak with one voice? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I have been informed - and perhaps Mr. Salinger can correct me - that that interview was given on January 12, which was before the administration took over January 20 and before we gave any indication that we would like all statements dealing with national security to be coordinated. I would say that this makes me happier than ever that such a directive has gone out. [Laughter
     [ 8.] Q. Mr., President, I would like to change the scene here to Cuba, if I may, for a moment. A member of Congress has raised the issue of possible conflict in our trade policy towards Cuba. He points out that under President Eisenhower's order all exports from this country to Cuba were barred. On the other hand, we are now importing considerable quantities of Cuban goods. Specifically this member of Congress pointed out one liquor company has purchased $12 million of Cuban molasses. Also we are importing considerable quantities of Cuban fruit and vegetables. Have you done anything about it or are you looking into this matter or contemplate doing anything about it? 
     THE PRESIDENT. The molasses has not been purchased as yet. It was intended, as I understand, to be purchased during the next month, and that is a private transaction. There are seventy, I think, or eighty million dollars worth of fruit, tobacco, and so on which are coming in, mostly to Florida. We are now making a study of what would be the most beneficial action we could take in regard to that. 
     On the molasses there is some question as to under what conditions we could intervene in that transaction, but, of course, it has been my hope that that transaction would not be consummated. I am not convinced that we are totally without resources and we are considering what we could take to consider that particular transaction. Twelve million dollars, I believe, is supposed to be made into gin - and I am not sure that that is in the public interest. [Laughter
     [ 9.] Q. Sir, on the space probe towards Venus made by the Soviets recently, do you think this would point up any space gap between our two countries, and do you see there is any need for a speedup in our efforts in that field? 
     THE PRESIDENT. The Soviet Union, as I said in the State of the Union, of course, is ahead of us in boosters and there is an indication they are going to be ahead of us for some time to come. This was, as I said in my statement at the time, this is a scientific achievement that is an impressive one. We have made exceptional gains in space technology, which may not be as dramatic as Sputnik or as a probe to Venus but which in the long run does, at least I think should, give all Americans satisfaction in the efforts that we have made. 
     Boosters, however, we are behind on and it is a matter of great concern. The Soviet Union made significant breakthrough in this area some years ago. They have continued to maintain their lead, and it explains why they were ahead of us in Sputnik and it explains why they have been able to put larger objects into space. We have to recognize their chances of continuing to do that unless we are able to make a breakthrough before the Saturn booster comes into operation. Unless we are able to make a scientific breakthrough we have to recognize that we are in a position - secondary position on boosters. It is a matter of great concern. We have sufficiently large boosters to protect us militarily, but for the long, heavy exploration into space, which requires large boosters, the Soviet Union has been ahead and it is going to be a major task to surpass them. 
     [ 10.] Q. Mr. President, this is a question on the sound dollar. A relative of yours, a Republican relative, Mr. Bayard Auchincloss of Oklahoma City, has started a one-man campaign to regain - to restore the sound dollar. He has said that the public needs to be inspired by some forceful leadership in Washington to lead them in one major phase - and that is: fighting Government waste. Sir, do you propose to spark such leadership from the White House, or do you have other means in mind by which the public can assist you in regaining the sound dollar? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I don't want to deny kinship. But I - to the best of my knowledge, he is not related to me. 
     Q. Your step-second cousin. [Laughter
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, then he is related to me. But we have not met; I have not heard from him directly. We want to - as a matter of fact, several members of the Congress - I was Chairman of the Subcommittee on Government Reorganization which attempted to put through some of the Hoover Commission recommendations - we are going to continue to work with a smaller staff beginning, of course, from the White House. And I am hopeful that all members of this Government will not consider now that they have been placed in position of responsibility that the test of their good work is the size of their staff. We are going to continue to try and will seek the cooperation of every citizen of this country in making sure that we get value for every dollar that the Government spends. 
     The Government spends a great deal of money. In fact, I asked, yesterday, Mr. Bell to talk to Senator Douglas and Congressman Hébert, who conducted hearings on waste in the Pentagon and have suggested it might be possible to save more than $1 billion, to meet with them. And we are going to continue to meet with every citizen, whether he is my relative or not - I would be glad to hear from Mr. Auchincloss. It is an important problem. When the Government spends over $80 billion we know we can do a better job in spending that money more wisely. And I would be delighted and I welcome the view of Mr. Auchincloss or any other citizen and all members of this administration to try to maintain a balance between revenue and expenditures. 
     [ 11.] Q. Mr. President, in regard to your program to distribute surplus foods to needy people in other countries, 2 weeks ago Dr. Fry, who is head of the World Council of Churches, advocated that this be done through Government channels and not through church or other private agencies. He said that the private agencies just can't insure that the food is going to reach the most needy, which our Government regulations require. Has your administration formulated a policy on this, or do you have a comment on it? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, of course some does go through the governments and then we have relied upon private agencies. I would be very reluctant to abandon private agencies because they have done a first-class job in assisting us to get this food out. 
     I would be glad to see his comments and see what his suggestions would be. The alternative, of course, would be for us to distribute through the government involved, and we have never felt that that was better than having it done through voluntary groups. But Mr. McGovern is now in Latin America and he is looking at what we can do in that area, in food for peace, and I am sure that he will come back with some proposals on how we can make this distribution more effective. 
     Q. May I just say, excuse me, sir, Dr. Fry does not suggest clothing and so forth - he still wants that which is contributed voluntarily to be distributed through the church. But just our Government surplus food. 
     THE PRESIDENT. We will look into that. 
     [ 12.] Q. Mr. President, have you determined whether any employee of our State Department was responsible or had any part in advancing the Communist foothold in Cuba, and if so, sir, will you take steps to remove them from office? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I think that probably mis-calculations were made by our country in assessing in Cuba, but I have no evidence that anyone did it out of any other motive but to serve the United States. 
     [ 13.] Q. Mr. President, to clarify an earlier answer you made, is it your view that we can proceed in serious negotiations with the Soviet Union in such areas as arms control and nuclear test ban while they continue to agitate the situation in the United Nations and in the Congo? In other words, can we conduct relations with them in compartments? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I am hopeful that all countries that are members of the United Nations will make a determination to operate in the Congo through the United Nations. I think that that is essential. As I said in my statement, unilateral intervention by one country or a group of countries outside of the United Nations, would endanger the United Nations and endanger peace in Africa. I am hopeful that that will come to be the judgment of all members of the United Nations. And if it does, I think that we will find ourselves with the prospects of peace increased. 
      [ 14.] Q. Following up Mr. Kent's question, Mr. President, the Republican Party as a whole seems to also take the view that your administration has overstated the economic recession. I wonder, sir, if you have given any thought to conferring with the Republican leaders in Congress in hopes of getting their support for your program to solve the economic recession, and if you have made available to them all the information that your administration has on the economic situation? 
     THE PRESIDENT. To answer your second part, we have made available all the information that we have. I have described it. Everyone can look at these figures and come to the conclusion that - their own conclusion. I see no necessity or desirability of minimizing our problems. I think only by facing the problems with precision is it possible to get action. 
     I want the cooperation of the leadership on both sides and will make every effort that I can to seek the support of Members of the House and Senate on both sides of the aisle. But anyone who looks at the million cars in inventory today, who looks at the figures on unemployment, who looks at the steel capacity operating at about 50 percent of capacity - who looks at the 600,000 Americans who have exhausted their unemployment compensation, who looks at five and a half million Americans who are out of work, who looks at our decline in economic growth since last spring, I would say would come to the same conclusion that I have: that it is necessary for us to take action. 
     The fact that a judgment was made the last year about what 1960 would be - 1960 was not the most prosperous year in our history as had been estimated earlier. We are now - find ourselves obliged to take action this winter. And by calling it a recession or calling it - saying it is not a recession, calling it a plateau - that's no excuse for not taking action. In my opinion it is essential that we move forward this winter because we don't want to find ourselves in the winter and the spring and the summer debating about our problem of whether we are in an economic recession or whether we have an economic decline and finding at the end of the congressional session that no action has been taken, only that all of my statements have had impact, I believe, of a snowflake in the Potomac, which was the description used by a distinguished Member of the Congress. I hope they have more effect than that. 
     [ 15.] Q. Mr. President, your task force on distressed areas considers an independent agency with an administrator directly responsible to you the most efficient way of coping with this urgent problem. They are fearful that it might get fragmented if it were made a bureau in the Commerce Department. Do you have any objection to the creation of an independent agency under your authority? 
     THE PRESIDENT. I believe that it would be most advantageous to have it in the Department of Commerce with all of the resources of the Department of Commerce to supplement its work. That would be my first choice. If the Congress makes a different judgment, however, I would accept that and say that an independent agency would be useful. But I do think that with Governor Hodges, who is committed to the program, with a Cabinet officer to represent their views at Cabinet meetings, and with the broad range of responsibilities which the Department of Commerce has, that this is the best place to put it. But this is a matter on which - I would certainly listen to the Congress if they came to a different conclusion. 
     [ 16.] Q. Mr. President, if other nations become reluctant to assign troops to the U.N. for police work in the Congo, would you tell us whether we would consider contributing American units? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, we are now hopeful that the policy which the Secretary General has followed, of securing troops for the Congo from Africa and Asia - we are hopeful that that is going to be successful. And until that fails - I don't think we should go under any assumption that he is going to fail, and if he does fail then we will have to make a new judgment. But I am hopeful that those countries which are most involved with maintaining the security and independence of the African countries and peace in Africa, that they will continue to respond to the Secretary General's appeal for support. And that is also true, of course, of Asian nations who are also concerned, particularly the smaller countries. We hope that they can maintain control of troop movements and not begin to have troops from larger countries with all of the hazards that that might bring. 
     Q. Mr. President, in view of your remarks about the Congo and other world problems, do you regard the future developments in the Congo as a kind of good faith test for the prospect of improving the international atmosphere as a whole? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, of course, if we fail - if the United Nations fails in the Congo, if we who are members of the United Nations fail, then of course the future usefulness of the United Nations will be impaired. And I think that this would be particularly serious for smaller countries. 
     As I said in my statement, the United States is not a small country. We can defend ourselves. Countries which I think must rely particularly upon the United Nations are smaller countries. The smallest country in the United Nations has the same vote in the General Assembly as the Soviet Union and the United States. And therefore I would think that they would be reluctant to see the United Nations fragmented, to see its usefulness impaired, to see the authority of the Secretary General, who represents all the members of the United Nations, to see it lessened. So I regard this as a most important test of the future effectiveness of the United Nations. 
     Q. Mr. President, do you find that the United States as a great power, as you have described, with legitimate interests all around the world, is sometimes hampered in the pursuit of these national interests by its membership in the United Nations? Could you conceive of a situation perhaps in Latin America where we would be hampered in a place where we had a vital interest by United Nations action? 
     THE PRESIDENT. Well, I suppose it is possible always to conceive of situations, but I will say that the United Nations action in - for example, the fact that they maintained troops in the Gaza Strip for a number of years, I think, has been helpful in maintaining peace in that area. And the Congo has been an extremely difficult assignment and responsibility for the United Nations. But at least we have not had as yet massive unilateral intervention by great powers with all of the risks of war that that might bring, and with all the dangers to the peace that that might bring, because of the way the United Nations has met its responsibilities. So, I am a strong believer in the United Nations and while it is possible to say that they might interfere with some legitimate interest of ours in the future, I am prepared to say that their actions in the past, at present, and I believe in the future represent the legitimate common interest of all members of the United Nations. 
     Reporter: Thank you, Mr. President. 
     THE PRESIDENT. Thank you.

 


NOTE: President Kennedy's fourth news conference, broadcast over radio and television, was held in the State Department Auditorium at 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening, February 15, 1961


 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#36 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:27 AM

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36.

 

Exchange of Messages With Prime Minister Adams of the West Indies 

on the Occasion of the Signing of a Mutual Defense Agreement. February 16, 1961

Released February 16, 1961. Dated February 9, 1961

 

Dear Mr. Prime Minister: 
     I wish to thank you and your cabinet colleagues for your thoughtful message of congratulation upon my inauguration in office. It gives me particular pleasure upon the occasion of the signing of a new agreement providing for our mutual defense to reciprocate your confidence in the endurance and strength of the present friendly relations between our two countries. The United States looks forward to the time when The West Indies will become an independent member of the British Commonwealth of Nations and to the opportunity of welcoming her into the hemispheric community. 
         Sincerely,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

[His Excellency, Sir Grantley Adams, C.M.G., Q.C., Prime Minister of The West Indies, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad]

NOTE: Prime Minister Adams' letter, dated February 14, 1961, follows:

The President of the United States 
White House

Dear Mr. President: 
     I offer my sincere thanks for the great kindness of your letter sent to me on the occasion of the signing of the Defence Areas Agreement in Port of Spain. The reading of your letter added a note of the highest significance to the Signing Ceremony. 
     My Government and I warmly reciprocate your expressions of good will which serve to increase our satisfaction in the close and enduring friendship between our two countries, upon which this Agreement and our cooperation in defence and other spheres, are founded. 
     We are particularly grateful to you, Mr. President for having made it possible for The Honourable John Hay Whitney to be your special representative at the culminating stage of an understanding, to the success of which Mr. Whitney's broad vision and sincerity have made so unique a contribution. 
     All has gone well and to good purpose. The presence of Mr. Weaver and Dr. Garcia at this time and their wide knowledge and sympathetic 
approach to human problems in their respective fields, have enabled us to have with them discussions which proved of the highest value to us. 
     I would also pay tribute to the magnificent efforts, over many months, of United States Officials and Services who produced work of the highest distinction, enabling this Agreement which gives such mutual satisfaction, to be perfected so expeditiously. 
         Yours sincerely,

 GRANTLEY ADAMS

 On February 15 the White House released a statement by Ambassador John Hay Whitney, chairman of the U.S. delegation in the negotiations with the Federation of the West Indies. The text of Ambassador Whitney's statement is published in the Department of State Bulletin (vol. 44, p. 350). Other members of the delegation included George Weaver, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Labor, and Dr. Hector Garcia. 
     The agreement between the United States and the Federation of the West Indies concerning U.S. defense areas in the Federation entered into force February 10, 1961, the date of signing. It is printed together with related documents in Treaties and Other International Acts Series 4734 (Government Printing Office). 
  
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#37 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:28 AM

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37.

 

Telegram to the Governors of the States 

Urging Action To Bolster the Economy by Speeding Up Public Works. 
February 16, 1961

(Released February 16, 1961. Dated February 15, 1961)

Dear Governor ---------------- 
     I urge prompt consideration of specific action at every level of government in this country to invigorate our economy, including acceleration of State and local projects that are genuinely useful and will provide immediate jobs and business help. I also personally want to emphasize the fact that the Federal Government has released for obligation this month $724 million for the Federal Aid Highway Program and $350 million in appropriations for direct Federal construction and construction grants primarily for hospitals, schools in federally affected areas, and waste treatment facilities. Use of these funds is now largely dependent on State and local action. I will appreciate your cooperation to speed these and other needed public programs to strengthen the economy in your area and throughout the Nation.

JOHN F. KENNEDY


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#38 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:29 AM

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38.

 

Statement by the President on Secretary Rusk's Decision To 

Attend the SEATO Council of Ministers Meeting in Bangkok. February 16, 1961

 

I AM HIGHLY PLEASED that the Secretary of State, despite his crowded calendar, has decided to attend the SEATO Council of Ministers Meeting at Bangkok on March 27. 
     The Council Meeting will afford the Secretary his first opportunity to meet personally with the Foreign Ministers of the member states of this important organization. This meeting will also provide the Secretary with a far-reaching opportunity to participate in and contribute to SEATO's vital work of promoting peace, stability and regional solidarity in the face of the threat now posed to Southeast Asia by the continuing communist pressures. One of the subjects the Secretary expects to discuss with his colleagues in SEATO will be the most effective way to conduct the future business of that Organization. 
     Details of Mr. Rusk's itinerary as well as the composition of the Delegation will be announced later by the Department of State. I understand that the Secretary's time is severely limited and that his route to Bangkok will necessarily be as direct as possible.

 

NOTE: The list of members of the U.S. delegation accompanying Secretary Rusk to the SEATO Council at Bangkok is published in the Department of State Bulletin (vol. 44, p. 550). 
 


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

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#39 Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:30 AM

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39.

 

Letter to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House 

Transmitting a Special Program for Feed Grains. 
February 16, 1961

 

Dear Mr. ----------: 
     I am transmitting herewith a bill to provide a special program for feed grains for 1961. I urgently recommend to the Congress the enactment of this emergency program so that it can cover the 1961 crop. 
     The existing program has failed. It has resulted in the accumulation of a burdensome and dangerous surplus, mainly of commodities for which there is no adequate outlet even under our expanded programs of providing food for those in need. At the same time, it has failed to protect farm income, and it is threatening to drive down the prices farmers receive for hogs, cattle, poultry and eggs, and milk to disastrous levels. If this program is allowed to continue in effect for this year's crop, the stocks in Government hands will reach even more alarming proportions, a virtually unmanageable storage problem will be created, farm income will continue to suffer, and large amounts of Government funds will be needlessly expended. Immediate action is required to prevent further deterioration of this situation. In order to be effective with respect to this year's crops, a new program should be authorized by March 1st. 
     I believe that any legislation enacted should fit our over-all goal to use our agricultural abundance to meet the needs of our people, and at the same time provide a fair income for those who produce that abundance. We need to shift our production from commodities of which there is an unmanageable surplus to commodities for which there is a need, even as we curtail our production of those surplus commodities. The Secretary of Agriculture already has authority to take steps toward these goals with regard to some commodities, such as milk, soybeans and cottonseed, pork, poultry and eggs. However, new legislation is needed for effective action with respect to corn and other feed grains. The legislation I am now recommending will fill this gap with the authority needed to round out an emergency program for this year in the feed grain sector of our farm economy. 
     Although this is an emergency program, it is consistent with our long-range objectives and would accomplish the following: (1) a moderate increase in farm income; (2) a saving of several hundred million dollars of Government funds; and (3) a holding down or reduction of surplus stocks to more manageable proportions. This will be done without any material effect upon consumer prices. 
     The Government now holds 2.7 billion bushels of feed grains. The investment in feed grains stands at the all-time high of nearly $4 billion. The 1961 crop will soon be planted. By this fall, the nation will be confronted once again with a shortage of space in which to store grain. The shortage may amount to the off-farm space required for as much as 200 to 250 million bushels if we fail to take any preventive action now. The storage problem will be further accentuated in 1962. 
     The legislative proposals submitted herewith (1) would provide that cooperators would receive a support price of $1.20 a bushel for corn for 1961, and would receive supports for other feed grains in relation to those for corn; and (2) would authorize a special agricultural conservation program under which acreage previously planted to feed grains would be diverted from production for 1961. Unlike the present program under which a support price of $1.06 a bushel is paid to all producers without regard to any limit on production, producers will not be eligible for price supports under this new program unless they cooperate in the special agricultural conservation program. 
     This emergency program covers only the 1960 crop. I intend to recommend to the Congress other legislation covering both wheat and feed grain crops for subsequent years. 
     There is attached hereto a letter from the Secretary of Agriculture setting forth the details of the program. It is important that it be accorded the prompt consideration of the Congress. 
         Sincerely,

 JOHN F. KENNEDY

 

NOTE: This is the text of identical letters addressed to the Honorable Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the Senate, and to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
    Secretary Freeman's letter, dated February 16, 1961, was also released.


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Greg Burnham
Admin

 

 

"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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#40 Greg Burnham

Greg Burnham

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 11:31 AM

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40.

 

Statement by the President Upon Signing Order Establishing the 

President's Advisory Committee on Labor-Management Policy. February 16, 1961

 

I AM TODAY issuing an Executive Order establishing the President's Advisory Committee on Labor-Management Policy. The Committee is composed of the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Commerce and 19 other members from the public, labor and management. The Secretary of Labor and the Secretary of Commerce will alternate as chairman of the Committee for periods of one year, the Secretary of Labor serving during the first year. 
     The purpose of this Committee is to help our free institutions work better and to encourage sound economic growth and healthy industrial relations. The Committee will study, advise me, and make recommendations with respect to policies that may be followed by labor, management, government, or the public which will promote free and responsible collective bargaining, industrial peace, sound wage and price policies, higher standards of living and increased productivity. The Committee has been directed to include among the matters to be considered by it: (1) policies designed to ensure that American products are competitive in world markets, and (2) the benefits and problems created by automation and other technological advances. 
     I deem this a most important Committee. It will bring to the great problems in the fields of collective bargaining, industrial relations, wage and price policies, and productivity the experience and wisdom of labor, management and public experts in these fields. 
     It is my hope that the Committee may help restore that sense of common purpose which has strengthened our Nation in times of emergency and generate a climate conducive to cooperation and resolution of differences. 
     It is my hope that the advice of this Committee will assist the Government, labor, management, and the general public to achieve greater understanding of the problems which beset us in these troubled times and to find solutions consistent with our democratic traditions, our free enterprise economy, and our determination that this country shall move forward to a better life for all its people. 
     The membership list of the Committee is attached. It is gratifying that I have been able to obtain the participation of such outstanding persons in the Committee's work. I greatly appreciate the willingness of these public-spirited citizens to serve their country in this way. The fact that such highly qualified persons have agreed to be members of this important Committee augurs well for its success.

NOTE: For citation to Executive Order 10918, see Appendix B. 
     The following list of members was released with the President's statement: 
     Management: Thomas J. Watson, Jr.; President of International Business Machines (New York); Joseph Block, President of Inland Steel Corporation (Illinois); Henry Ford, II, Chairman of the Board, Ford Motor Company (Michigan); J. Spencer Love, Chairman of the Board, Burlington Industries (North Carolina); John Franklin, President of the United States Lines (New York); Richard S. Reynolds, Jr., President of Reynolds Aluminum (Virginia); Elliot V. Bell, Editor and Publisher of Business Week (New York). 
     Labor: George Meany, President of the AFL-CIO; Walter Reuther, President of the UAW; David Dubinsky, President of the ILGWU; George M. Harrison, President of the Railway Labor Clerks; Thomas Kennedy, President of the UMW; David J. McDonald, President of United Steelworkers; Joseph D. Keenan, Secretary-Treasurer of the International Electrical Workers. 
     Public: Ralph McGill, Editor of the Atlanta Constitution (Georgia); David L. Cole, labor arbitrator from Paterson, New Jersey; Dr. George W. Taylor, University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Labor Relations, Wharton School of Business Administration; Clark Kerr, Chancellor of the University of California; Dr. Arthur F. Burns, Chairman of the National Bureau of Economic Research; Secretary of Commerce Luther H. Hodges (ex officio); Secretary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg (ex officio). 
 


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Greg Burnham
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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- JFK

"It is difficult to abolish prejudice in those bereft of ideas. The more hatred is superficial, the more it runs deep."  -- Farewell America (1968) 

“The ancient Greek definition of happiness was the full use of your powers along lines of excellence."  -- JFK

"A wise man can act a fool, but a foolish man can never act wise."  -- Unknown

 

Website:

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